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I have started at a new job where I need to implement a version control system from scratch. At my previous job, I implemented version control using Subversion (specifically, Visual SVN Server with TortoiseSVN, AnkhSVN, and SubClipse clients).

I have heard a lot about Git recently, but I have never used it. Most articles I'm reading online say that Git is better than Subversion. I'm not asking which is better here, so please leave those comments to yourselves.

In terms of my environment, I am the lead developer in a small GIS firm. We mostly work with Python scripts and occasionally plugin tools written in .Net. There are a couple others here that work with Python scripts and would also be working under version control. Recently, I began working on my first web application (HTML/Javascript) that should also be under version control. We are all working in a strictly Windows environment using both proprietary and open source software and API's.

I have 2 questions:

  1. If I already know Subversion, is it worth the time and effort of learning and implementing Git?
  2. What is the best resource for learning Git after using Subversion and how can I get started quickly?
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closed as not constructive by CharlesB, qqx, chepner, bahrep, towi Feb 27 '13 at 1:22

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6  
Yes, it is worth it, and the Git documentation is a great place to start. –  Lucas Feb 26 '13 at 16:49
    
I also recommend Git for ages 4 and up. It's about an hour long, but well worth the watch (and it has tinker toys!). I got a much clearer mental model of what Git does "under the hood" because of this video. –  Jack Maney Feb 26 '13 at 17:32
    
Did someone go through and downvote all the answers? How sad. –  Don Branson Feb 26 '13 at 20:50
    
@DonBranson, seems several "somebodys" went through the answers and upvoted most of them ;-) –  vonbrand Feb 27 '13 at 2:03
    
As Lucas says, the git homepage is a great place to start. There are cheat sheets and tutorials there. Just set up something simple for your own use and hack away. Soon you'll get the hang of it. –  vonbrand Feb 27 '13 at 2:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Question 1a. Is it worth the time and effort to learn Git?

Yes, it's a very popular VCS and the poster child for DVCS. Anyone who spends more than 5 minutes a day thinking about Source Control should at least take a look at GIT and see what it has to offer, it's strengths and weaknesses.

Question 1b: Is it worth the time and effort implementing Git?

The fundamental difference between Git and Subversion is that Git is a distributed version control system where as Subversion is not. So, unless your workflow involves you having people, who are not in the same location but work on the same code base as you, SVN should pretty much cover meet all your SCM needs.

Migrating to Git because of the hype is not a wise decision, besides, the Git workflow is very different from Subversion and it will require your team to get used to it, which at times can be a steep learning curve for many developers

Question 2: Best Resource for learning Git

This is really subjective but the Git manual is a very good start as @Lucas mentioned. My recommendations below in order of preference:

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Thank you @Kata - We are all in the same location and are very rarely working on the same thing at the same time. We're more interested in version control for keeping track of which code was used on which project and changes as we continue to develop theses tools. We're not as concerned with multiple programmers working on the same files at the same time. –  Brian Feb 26 '13 at 16:58
    
@Brian I would say that Subversion is perfect for your scenario. Unless you have some die hards who prefer git (like me) and are going to scream at you for using Subversion, heck, they can even use git-svn. For the most part, stick to what works for you until you find a need to use Git. –  user626607 Feb 26 '13 at 17:00
    
Actually I think there 2 parts to question 1. 1a. Is it worth the time and effort to learn GIT?. Yes, it's a very popular VCS and the poster child for DVCS. Anyone who spends more than 5 minutes a day thinking about Source Control should at least take a look at GIT and see what it has to offer, it's strengths and weaknesses. 1b. Is it worth the time and effort implementing Git your answer is spot on. –  James Reed Feb 26 '13 at 17:05
    
@JamesReed Do you want to edit my answer with your additions? –  user626607 Feb 26 '13 at 17:06
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Git can do things easily that with SVN are impossible or hard. Yes, the workflow changes. One of the best things is that people get used to doing microcommits, i.e., really one change for each commit (not just dump a day's work into it). It is fast. There are nice tools like git bisect (Broken? Find out automatically (!) which of the hundreds or thousands of commits since "known good" to "now broken" is responsible.) Can work without being 'net connectivity, i.e., on the road. –  vonbrand Feb 27 '13 at 1:57

I introduced git at one company where I worked. Yes, it was worth it. Git is faster. Git has better branching and merging support (including private branches). Git includes features that boost productivity such as bisect and rebase. Git did have a learning curve - it takes time to get used to it. Even with that, it was worth it.

Yes, there's a lot of hype around git, but the presence of hype doesn't demonstrate lack of benefit any more that it demonstrates the presence of benefit.

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If you're starting from scratch, I see absolutely zero reason to even consider using SVN. Your existing knowledge of SVN is like my existing knowledge of how to use a straight razor: of some value, and if a straight razor is all you have available to you, then you have an advantage. For everyday shaving, though, I use a Remington.

Git is superior in every way. Even the "learning curve" argument no longer holds water; there are several quality graphical tools available for both Linux and Windows (GitHub for Windows, e.g.), and the CLI has a set of simplified commands that resemble the set of commands you'd be using with SVN. Even Visual Studio now has first-class Git integration in Visual Studio 2012 Update 2 (currently in RC), and other IDEs and advanced editors have had support for some years now. Git does branching & merging right (among a number of other things); none of the centralized systems do, and even the other DVCSes don't it so well as Git does. After using Git for over 7 years, I don't even know what the point of VCS is if you can't do branching & merging effectively.

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If I already know Subversion, is it worth the time and effort of learning and implementing Git?

Yes. Here are three excellent reasons:

  1. Git is useful even if your current project doesn't use Git: Even if you are on a Subversion repository, the git-svn tool allows you to checkout from Subversion as if it was a Git repo. The advantage is that you can version your code outside of Subversion for checkpointing purposes. I like to make tiny tweaks to my code, and keep checkpointing those changes. That way, if I suddenly decide not to do something, I can revert my code to a previous version.
  2. Git is useful if you do your own private projects: The best way to use Subversion is to run a server process. What if you don't have a server? Git can work without a server which makes it great to use for your own personal projects that you really don't plan to share with anyone else. For example, the RESTful interface is becoming quite popular, and maybe it's something you should be learning. Git can make a great version control system for playing around with REST.
  3. It can give you a leg up on your next job: Git is getting more and more popular to use on the job. Imagine a company interviewing you and several other clients. That company uses Git. You say you know Git and the other candidates say "Well, I don't know it, but I'm sure I could pick it up". Who's going to get that job?

What is the best resource for learning Git after using Subversion and how can I get started quickly?

The best way is to play around with it. There is an online Git Manual, but it's not quite as good or as complete at Subversion's manual. However, you already know version control, so you're already familiar with version control terms (branching, checkout, tagging, etc.), so it shouldn't be too difficult. I recommend setting up a project on GitHub, so you'll get use to the push/pull issues involved with Git.

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If I already know Subversion, is it worth the time and effort of learning and implementing Git?

Unrelated. You must to forgot most from SVN-experience before learning Git: it's strictly unconventional and non-traditional in the wide range of aspects

What is the best resource for learning Git after using Subversion and how can I get started quickly?

After Subversion - none. For clean brain it's help (as a must), Git Book and nearest bar or shop with the preferred strong drink as a cure "for the nerves"

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