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So I know that if I include an iFrame to a page that is not on the same domain I can't access that iframe's DOM via browser policy, but can a page that is in an iframe do any kind of parent document accessing?

Specifically I have to ideas that are contingent on this question:

  1. If the embedded page can tell that it is not the parent window, one could make either sites that are un-iframe-able so that if the page detects it is iframed it changes to a "Go Away" page OR you could make it only-iframe-able (similar to a server-side script for pages that are only meant to be includes), so that going to the page when it's not iframed would get a "Go Away" page.

  2. If the iframed page has certain liberties that the parent window does not, it could request the stylesheet of the parent window and set it as its on stylesheet, thus making the site integrate more with the parent document. (Of course, then I could just make my stylesheet relate more to the iframed site, knowing it will do this, but I don't see that as an issue).

Anybody know?

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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

With regards to #1, yes, you can tell if you are being framed using some simple javascript:

<script type="text/javascript">
if (self != top)
{
  // Framed!
}
</script>

Regarding #2, I'm not sure what you can do using the "top" variable, but I do know that you can change it's location (so if your site is framed by another site, you can have your frame change the location of the top frame - essentially redirecting the user directly to your site).

Not sure what else you can or can't do to the top frame though - someone else might be able to provide more information there.

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2  
I suggest ditching the HTML comments inside the script element, there's no point in catering for Netscape 2 any more. –  Quentin Oct 2 '09 at 13:30
    
@David - ok, fine, old habits die hard :) –  Eric Petroelje Oct 2 '09 at 13:32
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You might also be interested in this Coding Horror article about detecting frames. You can detect whether you've been framed, but there are also countermeasures that the "parent" page can take to prevent you from acting on that. Example from the article:

Detect whether you've been framed:

if (parent.frames.length > 0) {
    top.location.replace(document.location);
}

Prevent a frame from detecting and redirecting:

   var prevent_bust = 0  
   window.onbeforeunload = function() { prevent_bust++ }  
   setInterval(function() {  
     if (prevent_bust > 0) {  
       prevent_bust -= 2  
       window.top.location = 'http://server-which-responds-with-204.com'  
     }  
   }, 1)
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2  
Old post but thought I would add an observation. While you can be prevented from "busting" out of the iframe, you can always change the content of your page when iframing is detected to display some error message like "This page has been hijacked. You are not visiting this page on the genuine site please visit xyz.com/... to read the article." –  Endophage Apr 28 '11 at 18:42
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This is possible through embedding following JavaScript in the page:

if(top.location.href != self.location){
//do redirection or display message
}

You can have this Javascript as part of the site template and prevent any page from being displayed in IFrame

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I've done this before, and it has worked:

<script type="text/javascript">
if (window.parent != null)
{
  // Framed!
}
</script>
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