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I have a customers and orders table in SQL Server 2008 R2. Both have indexes on the customer id (called id). I need to return details about all customers in the customers table and information from the orders table, such as details of the first order.

I currently left join my customers table on a subquery of the orders table, with the subquery returning the information I need about the orders. For example:

SELECT c.id
        ,c.country      
        ,First_orders.product
        ,First_orders.order_id
FROM customers c

LEFT JOIN   SELECT( id, 
                    product 
            FROM (SELECT    id
                            ,product
                            ,order_id
                            ,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY Order_Date asc) as order_No 
                        FROM orders) orders
            WHERE Order_no = 1) First_Orders
ON c.id = First_orders.id

I'm quite new to SQL and want to understand if I'm doing this efficiently. I end up left joining quite a few subqueries like this onto the customers table in one select query and it can take tens of minutes to run.

So am I doing this efficiently or can it be improved? For example, I'm not sure if my index on id in the orders table is of any use and maybe I could speed up the query by creating a temporary table of what is in the subquery first and creating a unique index on id in the temporary table so SQL Server knows id is now a unique column and then joining my customers table to this temporary table? I typically have one or two million rows in the customers and orders tables.

Many thanks in advance!

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1  
From a readability standpoint, most SQL developers will try to avoid nested subqueries like this if they can. In cases where chaining derived tables like this is needed, the preference is to use CTE's via the WITH command prefix instead. Performance-wise it shouldn't make any difference though, it's just a matter of convention and readability. –  RBarryYoung Feb 26 '13 at 17:24

2 Answers 2

For someone who is just learning SQL, your query looks pretty good.

The index on customers may or may not be used for the query -- you would need to look at the execution plan. An index on orders(id, order_date) could be used quite effectively for the row_number function.

One comment is on the naming of fields. The field orders.id should not be the customer id. That should be something like 'orders.Customer_Id`. Keeping the naming system consistent across tables will help you in the future.

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You can remove one of your subqueries to make it a little more efficient:

SELECT c.id
        ,c.country      
        ,First_orders.product
        ,First_orders.order_id
FROM customers c
   LEFT JOIN  (SELECT id
                    ,product
                    ,order_id
                    ,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY Order_Date asc) as order_No 
               FROM orders) First_Orders
     ON c.id = First_orders.id AND First_Orders.order_No = 1

In your above query, you need to be careful where you place your parentheses as I don't think it will work. Also, you're returning product in your results, but not including in your nested subquery.

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