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PART 1: I have a very odd situation, where in, I have to get the constructors of several classes called before main() or as soon as it enters main(). There's another sub-system which needs that data ASAP main() of this sub-system starts and more stuff, which make this concept appear more useful.

I have two approaches here:

  1. Use a global object before main().

  2. use a static class definition, in the first line of main().

One more idea, is(since I use gcc) is to use the attribute __constructor__ gcc reserved function.

What would you suggest?

PART 2: To add further to the issue, I need to decouple the development of those classes.(This is more of a code base design issue.)

That is, if someone is writing a classA and someone else is writing classB, then we would have two separate files with classA and classB, defined and calling their own constructors within their files/modules.

This is a sample code, that illustrates my idea:

class Init_myclass
{
public:
  Init_myclass(): myvar(10)
  {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << ":" << myvar << std::endl;
  };
private:
  int myvar;
};

static Init_myclass TestInit; //Initializing object prior to main
int main ()
{
  std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
  //Use the data populated by the Init_myclass constructor
  return 0;
}

In the above code, replace Init_myclass with 100s of class definitions like classA,classB,etc.

The other approach is using a single constructor in a file to call multiple classes constructors defined in other files, from within.

Here's the sample code that might help you understand my idea:

class InitializeOne
{
public:
  InitializeOne(): myvar(10)
  {
    std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << ":" << myvar << std::endl;
    A bunch of constructors of other classes here();
    classA();
    classB();
    ....
  };
private:
  int myvar;
};

int main()
{
static InitializeOne TestInit;//Object after main
... //functions depending on data populated by Initialize constructor 
}

The initialization order of the classes doesn't matter, but they have to be initialized before main or as soon as entering main.

Which design is more preferable and why?

I hope, I am making my question understandable. If not, do let me know, what information I have missed out or oversimplified/complicated or such.

Thank You for your responses and time.

share|improve this question
    
IMHO, there's s.th wrong with the design of your subsystem (which you don't elaborate further), if it needs to rely on (at least so many) singletons. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 26 '13 at 17:29
    
That subsystem is a 3rd party DB engine, which in turn is monitored by the other processes for relevant data. I agree, that its really a bad design(evolved out of a mud ball), but that's how it gotta be, to be approved into the codebase. :( –  askmish Feb 26 '13 at 17:33
    
OK, I already guessed s.th. like this. In this case you should provide just one singleton class, that calls all the necessary constructors on it's own instantiation (constructor). In other words: Make a singleton class, that instantiates members for all the classes that need to be instantiated on main() entry, and access your singleton instance once. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 26 '13 at 18:20
    
The last InitializeOne creates all those classes, _and immediately destroys them before main begins. It sounds like that's not what you want. –  TBohne Feb 26 '13 at 18:44
    
@MooingDuck: It will delete before main() begins? Its a static one right? –  askmish Feb 26 '13 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

You should opt for approach 2. if possible.

Create one singleton class:

class InitializeOnce {

public:
    static InitializeOnce& getInstance()
    {
        static InitializeOnce theInstance;
        return theInstance;
    }

    virtual ~InitializeOnce() {}

    classA& getClassA() { return classA_; }
    classB& getClassB() { return classB_; }

private:
    classA classA_;
    classB classB_;

    InitializeOnce()
    : classA_()
    , classB_()
    {
    }

    InitializeOnce(const InitializeOnce& rhs); // Prohibit copying!
    InitializeOnce& operator=(const InitializeOnce& rhs); // Prohibit assigning!
};

... and access it from main once:

int main()
{
    static InitializeOnce& theInstance = InitializeOnce::getInstance();

    // ... functions depending on data populated by Initialize constructor 
}

In case of approach 1. this would be:

static InitializeOnce& theInstance = InitializeOnce::getInstance();

int main()
{

   // ... functions depending on data populated by Initialize constructor 
}

Note
Your proposed approaches will result in different behavior, since function local static variables are guaranteed to be instantiated before at least 1st access to them, if you really need accessing it before main() is called you have to choose approach 1.

IMHO your 3rd idea should be avoided, compiler specific attribute definitions (even if it's gcc), will make the code less portable.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think local static variables are guaranteed to be initialized before the function begins –  TBohne Feb 26 '13 at 18:48
    
@MooingDuck Thanks, you're right, these are only guaranteed to be initialized once at least when the function is called. I'll correct this ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 26 '13 at 18:48
    
void foo() { if (0) { static int a = 100; std::cout << a;}} <-- even if you call this function, I don't think a is ever initialized. –  TBohne Feb 26 '13 at 18:51
1  
§ 6.7/4 "The zero-initialization of all block-scope variables with static storage duration or thread storage duration is performed before any other initialization takes place. Constant initialization of a block-scope entity with static storage duration, if applicable, is performed before its block is first entered. [Snip]. Otherwise such a variable is initialized the first time control passes through its declaration; such a variable is considered initialized upon the completion of its initialization." –  TBohne Feb 26 '13 at 18:53
    
@MooingDuck ... meant 'variable is accessed' –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 26 '13 at 18:54

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