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So we have a interface, called Func.java, that looks like this:

public interface Func<A,B> {
    public B apply(A x);
}

Then we have the main class, called mainClass.java, which looks like this:

public class mainClass{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    }

    public static <A,B,C> Func<A,C> compose(final Func<A,B> f, final Func<B,C> g){
        return new Func<A,C>(){
            public C apply(A x){
                return g.apply(f.apply(x));
            }
        };
    }
}

I am not really sure then how to call this compose method in the main method, and how this code actually compiles! I mean, are the java generics necessary here for this to work?

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Have you tried compiling it? –  user626607 Feb 26 '13 at 17:40

4 Answers 4

Here is how you can call compose:

public class mainClass {
    public static <A, B, C> Func<A, C> compose(final Func<A, B> f, final Func<B, C> g) {
        return new Func<A, C>() {
            public C apply(final A x) {
                return g.apply(f.apply(x));
            }
        };
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        Func<String, Double> toDouble = new Func<String, Double>() {
            public Double apply(final String x) {
                return Double.parseDouble(x);
            }
        };
        Func<Double, Integer> toInt = new Func<Double, Integer>() {
            public Integer apply(final Double x) {
                return (int) x.doubleValue();
            }
        };
        Func<String, Integer> composed = compose(toDouble, toInt);
        System.out.println("Composed: " + composed.apply("1.23"));
    }
}

I'm not quite sure what you're asking as far as generics being necessary. In the literal sense, no, they are not. Java generics just give you type safety. You could certainly scrap them completely and change A, B, and C to just be Objects instead. However, if you want to explicitly define the types being used, like in my example with String, Integer, and Double, then yes, you need to use generics in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice example. –  jlordo Feb 26 '13 at 18:03
public class FirstClassFunction {
   interface Func< A, B > {
      public B apply( A x );
   }

   static <A, B, C>
   Func< A, C > compose( final Func< A, B > f, final Func< B, C > g ) {
      return new Func< A, C >() {
         @Override public C apply( A x ) {
            return g.apply( f.apply( x ) );
         }};
   }

   public static void main( String[] args ) {
      Func< Double, Character > f =
         new Func< Double, Character >(){
            @Override public Character apply( Double x ) {
               return 'a';
            }};
      Func< Character, String > g =
         new Func< Character, String >(){
            @Override public String apply( Character x ) {
               return "Hello";
            }};
      Func< Double, String > c = compose( f, g );
      System.out.println( c.apply( 3.14 ));
   }
}
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An example:

A Func<A,B> that converts a String (A) to an Integer (B).

class Converter implements Func<String, Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer apply(String x) {
         // System.out.println("Converter converting String \"" + x + "\" to an Integer");
        return Integer.valueOf(x);
    }
}

Another Func<A,B> implementation, that converts an Integer (A) to a String (B), that represents the binary representation of that Strig

class Binary implements Func<Integer, String> {
    @Override
    public String apply(Integer x) {
        // System.out.println("Binary converting Integer " + x + " to binary String");
        return Integer.toBinaryString(x);
    }
}

And a main method demonstrating it.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // compose those to functions and you can convert strings representing
    // numbers (base 10) to Strings that represent the same number (base 2)
    Func<String, String> binaryStringConverter = compose(new Converter(), new Binary());
    System.out.println(binaryStringConverter.apply("123"));
}

To better understand what's happening you can uncomment the System.out.println() statements and run the code.

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If you're working in a problem domain that includes only operations on real numbers, you wouldn't necessarily need generics--the interface for Func could be just public double apply(double x). But using generics gives you the flexibility to have a function be a transformation from one type to another. The compose method just gives you a way of chaining functions, just like ordinary mathematical function composition.

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