Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm obviously misunderstanding something important about template specialization, because:

template<typename type> const type getInfo(int i) { return 0; }
template<> const char* getInfo<char*>(int i) { return nullptr; }

fails to compile with:

src/main.cpp:19:24: error: no function template matches function
        template specialization 'getInfo'

while

template<typename type> type getInfo(int i) { return 0; }
template<> char* getInfo<char*>(int i) { return nullptr; }

works fine. How do I use const with template specializations? What is my rookie mistake?

I am using c++11 on clang++.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Note that, in the first example, the return type is const type, so the const applies to the whole type. If type is char* (as in your specialisation), then the return type is a char * const. This compiles just fine:

template<typename type> const type getInfo(int i) { return 0; }
template<> char* const getInfo<char*>(int i) { return nullptr; }

This makes sense - if specializing the type as a pointer. Why should the template have any say over what the pointer points to?

However, in this situation, I don't see much reason for having the return type be const.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I've got to get const rules cemented sooner or later. The reason for the const return type relates to the original code. The version above was my minimal reproduction of the problem, so yes, it isn't really useful here. –  Ian Feb 26 '13 at 19:06

If you need to be able to return string constant just use this:

template<typename type> type getInfo(int i) { return 0; }
template<> const char* getInfo<const char*>(int i) { return nullptr; }

What you tried to do is something like:

const int getInfo( int i ) { return 0; }

it does not make much sense.

share|improve this answer
    
sftrabbit's answer gave me the epiphany to understand my mistake, but your answer was more what I actually needed, sorry I couldn't accept both! –  Ian Feb 26 '13 at 18:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.