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Built-in compiler variable types : int, float, double, short, ...
I need this to implement IsBetween

public bool IsBetween<T>(this T input) where T : [built-in compiler variable types] {
    return false;
}

Any alternative would be fine if there isn't exactly a direct way.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Fuex, Mahdi, NominSim, Athari, rae1 Mar 2 at 15:31

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Do you want to prevent all value types from being used, or only primitive types? I don't think the latter can be achieved with type parameter constraints. –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 26 '13 at 18:30
1  
What are "built-in compiler variable types"? –  BoltClock Feb 26 '13 at 18:31
2  
@Mahdi Built in, and numeric are completely separate. For example BigInteger is numeric but doesn't get any compiler special casing. –  CodesInChaos Feb 26 '13 at 18:33
1  
@Mahdi What you're looking for is overloads. You could overload it to every type, or you could just overload it to double and decimal. Up to you. –  It'sNotALie. Feb 26 '13 at 18:33
1  
@Mahdi Primitive and numbers are orthogonal concepts. bool is primitive, but not a number. BigInteger is a number, but not primitive. (Primitive is a pretty useless concept in general, and I believe the C# spec doesn't use it at all) –  CodesInChaos Feb 26 '13 at 18:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For IsBetween you don't need built in types, nor numeric types. You need types with an order, which implies implementing IComparable<T>:

public bool IsBetweenInclusive<T>(this T input, T lower, T upper)
    where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return IsBetweenInclusive(input, lower, upper, Comparer<T>.Default);
}

public bool IsBetweenInclusive<T>(this T input, T lower, T upper, IComparer<T> comparer)
{
    return (comparer.Compare(lower,input) <= 0)&&
           (comparer.Compare(upper,input) >= 0);
}
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This was actually what I needed. –  Mahdi Feb 26 '13 at 18:43
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If by "compiler variable types" you mean primitive types, there is no such restraint:

MSDN - Contraints on Type Parameters

You can use struct to allow most built-in types, but you could also define your own struct and it would be allowed.

I'm presuming you're building IsBetween to genericise the numeric comparison a <= x <= b. If that's your intent, the way to do it generically is to use IComparable<T>.

public static bool IsBetween<T>(this T input, T lower, T upper) where T : IComparable<T> {
    return lower.CompareTo(input) < 0 && input.CompareTo(upper) < 0;
}
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use where T : struct to cover all value types

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970.aspx

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1  
This will also allow the function to accept user defined value types, which the OP is attempting to exclude. –  Servy Feb 26 '13 at 18:37
    
+1 Simpler and faster. –  Fuex Feb 26 '13 at 18:44
    
@Fuex Simpler and faster is irrelevant when it doesn't work. –  Servy Feb 26 '13 at 18:47
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In C# there is no formal definition of what "primitive types" are; such a term is not mentioned in the specs.

There is no generic constraint that you can add that will restrict the input to only primitive types, because there's no way of knowing what those types might be.

The best you can do is have an overload of the method for each of the types that you want:

public bool IsBetween(this int input)
{
    return false;
}

public bool IsBetween(this double input)
{
    return false;
}

public bool IsBetween(this float input)
{
    return false;
}

//...

Note that due to implicit conversions between the operators, for example from int to long, from single to double, etc. you could optionally omit some of them and let the conversions handle it.

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At the CLR level there is Type.IsPrimitive, but I never really got the point of it. –  CodesInChaos Feb 26 '13 at 18:43
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It isn't clear what you mean by "built-in compiler variable types", maybe something like

public bool IsBetween<T>(this T input) where T : struct {
    return false;
}

could be suitable.

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