Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written an Emacs Lisp function which calls a shell command to process a given string and return the resulting string. Here is a simplified example which just calls tr to convert text to uppercase:

(defun test-shell-command (str)
  "Apply tr to STR to convert lowercase letters to uppercase."
  (let ((buffer (generate-new-buffer "*temp*")))
    (with-current-buffer buffer
      (insert str)
      (call-process-region (point-min) (point-max) "tr" t t nil "'a-z'" "'A-Z'")
      (buffer-string))))

This function creates a temporary buffer, inserts the text, calls tr, replaces the text with the result, and returns the result.

The above function works as expected, however, when I write a wrapper around this function to apply the command to the region, two steps are being added to the undo history. Here's another example:

(defun test-shell-command-region (begin end)
  "Apply tr to region from BEGIN to END."
  (interactive "*r")
  (insert (test-shell-command (delete-and-extract-region begin end))))

When I call M-x test-shell-command-on-region, the region is replaced with the uppercase text, but when I press C-_ (undo), the first step in the undo history is the state with the text deleted. Going two steps back, the original text is restored.

My question is, how does one prevent the intermediate step from being added to the undo history? I've read the Emacs documentation on undo, but it doesn't seem to address this as far as I can tell.

Here's a function which accomplishes the same thing by calling the built-in Emacs function upcase, just as before: on the result of delete-and-extract-region with the result being handed off to insert:

(defun test-upcase-region (begin end)
  "Apply upcase to region from BEGIN to END."
  (interactive "*r")
  (insert (upcase (delete-and-extract-region begin end))))

When calling M-x test-upcase-region, there is only one step in the undo history, as expected. So, it seems to be the case that calling test-shell-command creates an undo boundary. Can that be avoided somehow?

share|improve this question
    
The usual way to prevent the commands from cluttering the (undo) is to find a different way, one that does not do it. The example here is that you should almost never create a temporary buffer, but instead work with objects. –  PascalvKooten Feb 26 '13 at 18:58
    
Other than manually reading and writing to temporary files, I'm not sure of another way to capture process output. Even the asynchronous process commands like start-process seem to want to send the output to a buffer. –  Jason Blevins Feb 26 '13 at 19:46
1  
@JasonBlevins The fifth parameter to shell-command-on-region is REPLACE, so why do you need to wrap it? –  event_jr Feb 27 '13 at 0:26
    
@event_jr Good point: I wrote it this way to follow the "don't repeat yourself" principle, in order to have one function that returns a string and another that operates on the region, but without repeating the program name and arguments. There are, of course, multiple ways to avoid repeating oneself, and your comment points to other good ways of structuring it. –  Jason Blevins Feb 27 '13 at 3:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The key is the buffer name. See Maintaining Undo:

Recording of undo information in a newly created buffer is normally enabled to start with; but if the buffer name starts with a space, the undo recording is initially disabled. You can explicitly enable or disable undo recording with the following two functions, or by setting buffer-undo-list yourself.

with-temp-buffer creates a buffer named ␣*temp* (note the leading whitespace), whereas your function uses *temp*.

To remove the undo boundary in your code, either use a buffer name with a leading space, or explicitly disable undo recoding in the temporary buffer with buffer-disable-undo.

But generally, use with-temp-buffer, really. It's the standard way for such things in Emacs, making your intention clear to anyone who reads your code. Also, with-temp-buffer tries hard to clean up the temporary buffer properly.


As for why undo in the temporary buffer creates an undo boundary in the current one: If the previous change was undoable and made in some other buffer (the temporary one in this case), an implicit boundary is created. From undo-boundary:

All buffer modifications add a boundary whenever the previous undoable change was made in some other buffer. This is to ensure that each command makes a boundary in each buffer where it makes changes.

Hence, inhibiting undo in the temporary buffer removes the undo boundary in the current buffer, too: The previous change is simply not undoable anymore, and thus no implicit boundary is created.

share|improve this answer
    
I verified that using (generate-new-buffer " *temp*") in the original function works and that with-temp-buffer indeed creates a buffer whose name has a leading space. I read that part of the documentation, but I didn't think that was the issue since undo information is specific to each buffer. Why should I care whether undo information is recorded in the *temp* buffer? But what I didn't gather from the documentation is that, apparently, the act of recording undo information in the other buffer must set an undo boundary in the current buffer. –  Jason Blevins Feb 27 '13 at 16:14
    
@JasonBlevins An implicit boundary is created, if the previous change was undoable and made in some other buffer, in your case the temporary one. I have edited my answer to explain the details. Hopefully everything is clear now. –  lunaryorn Feb 27 '13 at 17:13

The solution in this case was to create the temporary output buffer using with-temp-buffer, rather than explicitly creating one with generate-new-buffer. The following alternative version of the first function does not create an undo boundary:

(defun test-shell-command (str)
  "Apply tr to STR to convert lowercase letters to uppercase."
  (with-temp-buffer
    (insert str)
    (call-process-region (point-min) (point-max) "tr" t t nil "'a-z'" "'A-Z'")
    (buffer-string)))

I was not able to determine whether generate-new-buffer is indeed creating the undo boundary, but this fixed the problem. generate-new-buffer calls get-buffer-create, which is defined in the C source code, but I could not quickly determine what was happening in terms of the undo history.

I suspect that the issue may be related to the following passage in the Emacs Lisp Manual entry for undo-boundary:

All buffer modifications add a boundary whenever the previous undoable change was made in some other buffer. This is to ensure that each command makes a boundary in each buffer where it makes changes.

Even though the with-temp-buffer macro calls generate-new-buffer much as in the original function, the documentation for with-temp-buffer states that no undo information is saved (even though there is nothing in the Emacs Lisp source that suggests this would be the case):

By default, undo (see Undo) is not recorded in the buffer created by this macro (but body can enable that, if needed).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.