Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have seen it many times like here AS3: How to convert a Vector to an Array and have never really learnt about it in any tutorials.

Even searched on google and got no results - http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=Foo+in+AS3&meta=

is it some sort of object or variable type that I have been missing?

Or is it something that comes with some external library?

When I compile my code with Foo I get

Type was not found or was not a compile-time constant: Foo.

Thanks

share|improve this question
6  
This made my day! Many years ago when I started working w/unix, I wondered the same thing. What is all this "foo, bar, baz" stuff that I saw my friends typing. This was before the internet was popular (my friends were really geeks). I'm sure you're not alone in wondering what it all means, each new generation of programmers has probably wondered the same thing. –  Sunil D. Feb 26 '13 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's not an actual type, just a placeholder to be useful for giving an example. Sometimes referred to as a metasyntactic type.

So, you have to substitute an actual type in place of Foo when attempting to compile the code, else it won't compile, obviously.

share|improve this answer
    
oh! thanks! that was stupid of me. –  Joe Slater Feb 26 '13 at 19:19

Foo is just a term used in programmer's slang for variables examples when the name doesn't really matter, or to represent a value that's not important.

You can read about the "Foo" term at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3092.txt

share|improve this answer

Foobar - Wikipedia:

the use of foo in a programming context is generally credited to the Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC) from circa 1960. However, the precise relationship of these terms is not known with certainty, and several anecdotal theories have been advanced to identify them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.