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I'm trying to bind both a mouseenter and a mouseleave event to each <li> within a container, but both events share a few common variables I'd like to share between the 2 events.

I know it would be very simple to do something like this:

$( '.nav li' )
    .on( 'mouseenter', function()
    {
        var $children   = $( this ).find( '.children' ),
            h           = $children.children().outerHeight(),
            speed       = 250;
        $children
            .stop().clearQueue()
            .animate({ height: h }, speed );
    })
    .on( 'mouseleave', function()
    {
        var $children   = $( this ).find( '.children' ),
            h           = $children.children().outerHeight(),
            speed       = 250;
        $children
            .stop().clearQueue()
            .animate({ height: 0 }, speed );
    });

But what sort of performance hinderances would be involved in storing variables within the scope of the "each" function? (To avoid copying and pasting variables in both bind)

$( '.nav li' ).each( function()
{
    var $children   = $( this ).find( '.children' ),
        h           = $children.children().outerHeight(),
        speed       = 250;

    $( this )
        .on( 'mouseenter', function()
        {
            $children
                .stop().clearQueue()
                .animate({ height: h }, speed );
        })
        .on( 'mouseleave', function()
        {
            $children
                .stop().clearQueue()
                .animate({ height: 0 }, speed );
        });
});

The reason I am not using something like (function(){})() is because each list item has it's own children.

So what are the performance differences?

share|improve this question
    
You'll have a slightly larger performance hit on binding, but the event will execute a tiny bit faster. This is probably premature optimization. the difference between the two will be negligible assuming this is a navigation menu and i doubt you have thousands of navigation items. –  Kevin B Feb 26 '13 at 20:01

1 Answer 1

I am confused, but why not just bind them both in the same call as it looks identical between both of them.

.bind('mouseenter mouseleave', function(event){
  var $children   = $( this ).find( '.children' ),
    h           = event.type == "mouseenter" ? $children.children().outerHeight() : 0,
    speed       = 250;
        $children
            .stop().clearQueue()
            .animate({ height: h }, speed );

 })
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that would work in this particular example, thank you. Imagine there is more complicated code in each function, and the only similarity is a few variables. What would you do? A cluster of intermittent ternary operators is not my preferred solution. –  Morgan Delaney Feb 26 '13 at 20:57

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