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I've made a class in my header file which creates and populates three arrays like so:

class ExampleClass {
private:
    string array1[5] = {"test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5"};
    double array2[4] = {20.7, 26.4, 27.8, 31.1};
    double array3[4] = {19.1, 25.8, 27.3, 32.3};
};

When building I'm receiving a warning about this requiring -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11 to work. It builds fine and works how I want for me, but is this something I should worry about in case I was going to include it in a uni project for example?

Is it a case where there's an older alternative that does the exact same, or was this only possible from C++11?

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5  
C-style arrays as class members have a reputation to be a pain to initialize in C++03, so go figure. :| –  Xeo Feb 26 '13 at 19:54
    
Can your arrays be const statics? –  Pubby Feb 26 '13 at 19:58
    
@Pubby Not going to lie, I have no idea :p –  Zackehh9lives Feb 26 '13 at 19:59
    
@Pubby Doesn't build –  Zackehh9lives Feb 26 '13 at 20:00
1  
@Zackehh9lives well, this could work: pastebin.com/raw.php?i=8z64aAuB –  Pubby Feb 26 '13 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

is this something I should worry about in case I was going to include it in a uni project for example?

If you're writing a project for an assignment you should pay attention to the requirements of the assignment. It should specify a platform, compiler, and build flags that your code must build and run on. If those requirements allow you to use C++11 then you're fine, if they don't then you'll have to find an alternative. And remember to always test your work on the platform, compiler, etc. that the graders will be using.

Is it a case where there's an older alternative that does the exact same, or was this only possible from C++11?

There is no pre-C++11 alternative that does exactly the same thing; prior to C++11 it was impossible to specify an initializer for member arrays. The closest you could get was to allow the default initialization to occur and then re-initialize the array in the constructor:

struct S {
    string array1[5];
    S() {
        string init_values[5] = {"test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5"};
        for (int i=0; i<5; ++i) {
            array1[i] = init_values[i];
        }
    }
};

C++11 introduced uniform initialization:

struct S {
    string array1[5];
    S() : array1{"test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5"}
    {}
};

And in-class initialization:

struct S {
    string array1[5] {"test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5"};
};
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If you are only reading from the arrays (as you said in the comments), add const.

CAUTION: Without const and when you start modifying values, the following will not work as expected!

The following is the best I could think of in C++03. While you could put everything into the header file, I don't think it's a good idea. I'll show how to do it with a header and an implementation file. If you really need everything in the header and you can't figure it out how to adapt the following code, ask.

We start by creating a header file foo.hpp:

#ifndef FOO_HPP
#define FOO_HPP

#include <string>

class ExampleClass {
private:
  const std::string (&array1)[5];
  const double (&array2)[4];
  const double (&array3)[4];

  ExampleClass(); // you need ctors to initialize the non-static members
};

#endif // FOO_HPP

Now that you have the header, create the implementation file foo.cpp:

#include "foo.hpp"

namespace
{
  const std::string global_array1[5] = {"test1", "test2", "test3", "test4", "test5"};
  const double global_array2[4] = {20.7, 26.4, 27.8, 31.1};
  const double global_array3[4] = {19.1, 25.8, 27.3, 32.3};
}

// define your ctor(s)
ExampleClass::ExampleClass()
  : array1( global_array1 ),
    array2( global_array2 ),
    array3( global_array3 )
{}
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