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I have a list of roughly 100,000 occurrences of items being ordered together that I have pasted into one column so I can count the number of times each combination occurs.

4845   Curly Fries California Burger   1
4846   French Fries California Burger  1
4847   Hamburger California Burger     1
4848   $1 Fountain Drinks Curly Fries  1
4849   $1 Fountain Drinks Curly Fries  1
4850   California Burger Curly Fries   1
4851   Curly Fries Curly Fries         1

I have explored the aggregate function which gives me the following error:

aggregate(t1$count,list(t1$pc), sum) <br>
Error in sort.list(y) : 'x' must be atomic for 'sort.list'
Have you called 'sort' on a list? <br>

I have also tried variations of ddply:

ddply(t1,t1$pc,transform,occurances=sum(t1$count))

But I get this error

Error in UseMethod("as.quoted") : 
no applicable method for 'as.quoted' applied to an object of class "c('matrix', 'list')"

I am assuming I get this because I am trying to essentially "group" by a character value. I have also explored tapply and recast based on answers to similar questions, but to no avail.

How can I get this count of combinations?

For consideration, a sample of items listed separately (again, apologies for the formatting issues):

                   Var1                     Var2 Var3
>2               Onion Rings              Onion Rings    1
>3  Pineapple Cheddar Burger              Onion Rings    1
>4               Onion Rings Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
>5  Pineapple Cheddar Burger Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
>5              Onion Rings              Onion Rings     1
>6  Pineapple Cheddar Burger              Onion Rings    1
>7               Onion Rings Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
>8  Pineapple Cheddar Burger Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
>9             Fountain Soda            Fountain Soda    1
>10             French Fries            Fountain Soda    1
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6  
You can use the table function for this: table(t1$pc). –  Justin Feb 26 '13 at 19:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your initial approach was pretty close to what I think you want. Combining those into a single factor will definitely work, provided you combine them in the same order, such that you don't end up with "Fries, Burger" and "Burger, Fries."

There may be an easier way of doing what you want, but I'm failing to brain what that is. Nevertheless, I think this does what you're looking for:

# Let's assume your data looks like this:
> df
                       Var1                      Var2 Var3
1               Onion Rings               Onion Rings    1
2  Pineapple Cheddar Burger               Onion Rings    1
3               Onion Rings  Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
4  Pineapple Cheddar Burger  Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
5               Onion Rings               Onion Rings    1
6  Pineapple Cheddar Burger               Onion Rings    1
7               Onion Rings  Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
8  Pineapple Cheddar Burger  Pineapple Cheddar Burger    1
9             Fountain Soda             Fountain Soda    1
10             French Fries             Fountain Soda    1

# Now, for each row
#     1. sort the Var1 and Var2,
#     2. combine the sorted vars, and
#     3. convert them back into a factor

df$sortcomb <- as.factor(apply(df[,1:2], 1, function(x) paste(sort(x), collapse=", ")))

table(df$sortcomb) # then use table as per normal

ddply(df, .(sortcomb), summarize, count=length(sortcomb)) # or ddply
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That works perfectly! Thank you for your patience. –  LFoos24 Feb 28 '13 at 22:39

The table() function is helpful here:

with(t1, table(pc)) ## or equivalently table(t1$pc)

This assumes pc is a factor variable that you want to count occurrences of. (If it isn't a factor it will get coerced to one.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the quick response. However when using > with(t1, table(pc)): I got , , pc.3 = Onion Rings Pineapple Cheddar Burger, pc.4 = Pineapple Cheddar Burger Pineapple Cheddar Burger, pc.5 = Onion Rings Onion Rings, pc.6 = Pineapple Cheddar Burger Onion Rings, ect –  LFoos24 Feb 26 '13 at 21:06
    
Well pasting all that together wasn't a good idea. How can we know computationally that "Onion Rings" is one thing and not two: "Onion" and "Ring". It would be better to have kept all the menu items separate and then work on comparing those combinations. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 26 '13 at 21:10
    
I originally had them as two separate variables but I had issues grouping them by combinations of those variables, which is what led me to paste them into a single field from which I would be able to group and count. Is there a way to group based on combinations? (I'm more familiar with SQL, so I am thinking something along the lines of GROUP BY Var1, Var2). Clearly I'm fairly novice with R so I apologize for any misunderstanding throughout this. I will amend above to reflect separated items. –  LFoos24 Feb 26 '13 at 21:27
    
Moving back to splitting the variables and using your table suggestion gives me a matrix counts for each combination, however in this format I cannot subset the top occurrences (which is ultimately what I am trying to accomplish) without losing the dimnames. –  LFoos24 Feb 26 '13 at 21:36

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