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Using the code below, 1 maxed out mesh draws at 60 FPS, 2 maxed out meshes draw at 33~ FPS, 3 maxed out meshes draw at 28~ FPS, 4 maxed out meshes draw at 20~ FPS. Am I doing something wrong, or am I reaching some sort of limit? It doesn't seem like I am drawing a lot of polygons but I am still new to programming so I don't know much. Please offer some efficiency advice. Thank you.

class PolygonManager
{
    List<List<VertexPositionColor>> vertices;
    VertexBuffer vertexBuffer;
    List<List<int>> indices;
    IndexBuffer indexBuffer;
    int meshRef;
    int indexRef;
    Random random;

    public PolygonManager()
    {
        vertices = new List<List<VertexPositionColor>>();
        vertices.Add(new List<VertexPositionColor>());
        indices = new List<List<int>>();
        indices.Add(new List<int>());
        meshRef = -1;
        indexRef = 0;
        random = new Random();
    }

    public void CreateMesh(int length, int width, Vector3 position, Color color)
    {
        meshRef = -1;
        indexRef = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < vertices.Count; i++)
        {
            if (vertices[i].Count <= 65536 - (length * width))
                meshRef = i;
        }

        if (meshRef == -1)
        {
            vertices.Add(new List<VertexPositionColor>());
            indices.Add(new List<int>());
            meshRef = vertices.Count - 1;
        }

        indexRef = vertices[meshRef].Count;

        for (int y = 0; y < length; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < width; x++)
            {
                vertices[meshRef].Add(new VertexPositionColor(new Vector3(x, 0, y) + position,
                                      new Color(color.R + (random.Next(-10, 10) / 100), color.G + (random.Next(-10, 10) / 100), color.B + (random.Next(-10, 10) / 100))));
            }
        }

        for (int y = 0; y < length - 1; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < width - 1; x++)
            {
                int topLeft = x + y * width;
                int topRight = (x + 1) + y * width;
                int lowerLeft = x + (y + 1) * width;
                int lowerRight = (x + 1) + (y + 1) * width;

                indices[meshRef].Add(topLeft + indexRef);
                indices[meshRef].Add(lowerRight + indexRef);
                indices[meshRef].Add(lowerLeft + indexRef);

                indices[meshRef].Add(topLeft + indexRef);
                indices[meshRef].Add(topRight + indexRef);
                indices[meshRef].Add(lowerRight + indexRef);
            }
        }
    }

    public void Draw(GraphicsDevice graphicsDevice, BasicEffect basicEffect)
    {
        for (int v = 0; v < vertices.Count; v++)
        {
            vertexBuffer = new VertexBuffer(graphicsDevice, typeof(VertexPositionColor), vertices[v].Count, BufferUsage.WriteOnly);
            vertexBuffer.SetData<VertexPositionColor>(vertices[v].ToArray());
            graphicsDevice.SetVertexBuffer(vertexBuffer);
            indexBuffer = new IndexBuffer(graphicsDevice, typeof(int), indices[v].Count, BufferUsage.WriteOnly);
            indexBuffer.SetData<int>(indices[v].ToArray());
            graphicsDevice.Indices = indexBuffer;
            foreach (EffectPass effectPass in basicEffect.CurrentTechnique.Passes)
            {
                effectPass.Apply();
                for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
                {
                    graphicsDevice.DrawIndexedPrimitives(PrimitiveType.TriangleList, 0, 0, vertices[v].Count, 0, indices[v].Count/3);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Moving the code where you initialize the buffers and write the data outside of the draw method should increase performance significantly.

Creating vertex and index buffers is an expensive operation. For static meshes (where the vertices don't change) you can reuse the buffers.

If the vertices/indices change often (once per frame) use a dynamic buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
I posted a long answer about stalling the pipeline and somehow managed to completely miss the fact that he was allocating entirely new buffers every frame. This is undoubtedly the correct answer. –  Cole Campbell Feb 26 '13 at 20:56
    
Thank you very much I will try it out. I'm so glad there are helpful people in this world. –  BCPowers Feb 26 '13 at 21:10
2  
I tried it an it works. I created a list of Vertex Buffers and Index Buffers so that meshes I create have their own and are defined when I create the mesh. FPS is back up to 60 with 4 maxed meshes. Thanks again. If I increase your reputation, I would. –  BCPowers Feb 26 '13 at 21:33

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