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I am pulling a random sample from some tables and noticed that depending on how I write the query it doesn't work. Obviously, I wasn't using all_tab_columns, I was just providing an example that would work on a vanilla instance (9.2.0.8).

Why does this work?

select * from (
    select 
        floor(dbms_random.value(0,1000)) as randomval
    from 
        all_tab_columns where rownum < 10000
) where randomval > 200 and randomval < 300;

But this doesn't return any results.

select * from (
    select 
        floor(dbms_random.value(0,1000)) as randomval
    from 
        all_tab_columns 
) where randomval > 200 and randomval < 300;

What does the rownum < 10000 in the query accomplish?

Edit: clarified what doesn't work.

Edit: added version 9.2.0.8

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3  
Can you define "doesn't work"? The second query certainly returns rows. The number of rows either query will return is unknown (though the first query can't possibly return more than 10,000 rows). –  Justin Cave Feb 26 '13 at 21:23
    
The second doesn't return any rows for me at all. I get "no rows selected" in sqlplus. –  unoriginalusername Feb 26 '13 at 21:33
2  
The nature of randomness is that it is random. Therefore it is quite possible that teh inner query returns no values between 201 and 299. Adding a filter on ROWNUM may in fact make this outcome more likely rather than less. So I think it is highly unlikely that you have a reproducible test case. –  APC Feb 26 '13 at 21:34
    
APC - I used a table with 6million results and tried my query with rownum < 10,000,000. The query returned ~600,000. which is the 10% random sample I was striving for. I just dont understand why the query seem to require the rownum < x where clause. –  unoriginalusername Feb 26 '13 at 21:38
1  
the rownum will prevent the outer predicates pushing into the inline view (ie it prevents the query being rewritten to the one that peter has shown). you should also see a "good" result with where rownum > 0 (or a no_merge / no_push_pred hint possibly too). There is a bug in 9i (9.2.0.2-.8 specifcially) btw on queries invloving dbms_random where views are merged (which I think is what is happening here) –  DazzaL Feb 27 '13 at 12:00

3 Answers 3

I don't have a definitive answer but I have a theory...

My guess is that your second query is getting optimized to this:

select * 
  from all_tab_columns 
 where floor(dbms_random.value(0,1000))> 200 
   and floor(dbms_random.value(0,1000)) < 300;

and that somehow having the rownum criteria in your inline view is preventing that optimization.

This also might explain why some of us (me included) aren't able to see the problem you described - because we're on different versions of Oracle and the query gets optimized differently for us.

Edit

After a bit of Googling, I came across this AskTom question, which seems related. Tom Kyte's answer ends with this line:

When calling functions from SQL, you had better not rely on how often the functions get called, in what order, or whatever. In short, assume nothing. And remember - SQL rewrites kick in and we rewrite your SQL all of the time. Don't rely on side effects

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1  
"and that somehow having the rownum criteria". rownum prevents predicate pushing (ie a predicate cannot push past rownum as it may change the answer) eg select * from (select * from all_objects where rownum > 0) where object_name = 'DUAL' and owner = 'SYS' will not be rewriten to push the object_name/type into the inner view (so you'll see in that example it will have to full scan the whole view first and perform poorly). the same effect would be seen with rownum in the inner select vs the where clause too. –  DazzaL Feb 27 '13 at 11:50

I think @Peter is on to something, but it requires a bit more explanation.

In Oracle, a function can be DETERMINISTIC or not. This means that the function, when called with the same arguments returns the same values. So, sqrt() is deterministic; dbms_random() is not. Other database uses the term STABLE versus VOLATILE for the two categories.

If I had to guess, the Oracle engine is smart enough to know that the following query should return rows:

select * from (
    select 
        dbms_random.value(0,1000) as randomval
    from 
        all_tab_columns 
) where randomval > 200 and randomval < 300;

However, I suspect that it is getting tripped up because of the floor(). That is, the compiler detects a "stable" function, so it just looks up the previous value. And, it uses the cached value, short-circuiting calling the function multiple times.

If this is correct, then the above query will return rows. If so, then I would call this "feature" of the database a bug -- there is probably a database optimization engineer somewhere, though, who would defend this as a very useful feature.

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Both of your queries work in Oracle 11g R2. The ROWNUM is pseudocolumn in Oracle, you can read about it if interested.

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