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I have the following function that is part of a crossword solver:

def CrosswordPossibleWords(p_words, p_cw_words):
    """For each word found in the crossword, find the possible words and keep track of the one with the minimum possible words.

    Keyword arguments:
    p_words    -- The dictionary words.
    p_cw_words -- The crossword word attributes.
    """
    l_min = 999999999
    l_min_index = -1
    l_index = 0
    l_choices = []
    for l_cw_word in p_cw_words:
        if l_cw_word[2] >= l_min_length and '-' in l_cw_word[4]:
            pattern = re.compile('^' + l_cw_word[4].replace('.', '%').replace('-', '.').upper() + '$', re.UNICODE)
            l_choice = []
            for l_word in [w for w in p_words if len(w) == len(l_cw_word[4])]:
                if re.match(pattern, l_word):
                    l_choice.append(l_word)
            l_choices.append(l_choice)
            if len(l_choice) < l_min:
                l_min_index = l_index
                l_min = len(l_choice)
        else:
            l_choices.append([])
        l_index = l_index + 1
    return (l_choices, l_min_index)

The crossword words are of the form:

[row, col, length, direction, word]

I have a '.' in a word if I can't solve that word and a '-' if I don't know that letter.

How can I make this code faster? It currently takes about 2.5 seconds to run. Was thinking of using numpy strings; since apparently numpy is 10 times faster, but I don't know anything about numpy and don't know whether I would be able to use all the current string functions with it.

Any ideas?

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closed as not a real question by Andy Hayden, tcaswell, Fredrik Pihl, Jon Clements, FelipeAls Feb 26 '13 at 22:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
numpy is 10 times faster at doing what, exactly? Find out where/how your program is spending its time, and optimize that. –  Scott Hunter Feb 26 '13 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could partition your dictionary by word-length BEFORE calling this function, so it doesn't have to re-do it with every call.

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Whilst I agree with Scott Hunter, you are probably looking for something like this where the lists are substituted with dicts:

def CrosswordPossibleWords(p_words, p_cw_words):
    """For each word found in the crossword, find the possible words and keep track of the one with the minimum possible words.

    Keyword arguments:
    p_words    -- The dictionary words.
    p_cw_words -- The crossword word attributes.
    """
    l_min = 999999999
    l_min_index = -1
    l_index = 0
    l_choices = {}    # using dict instead of list
    for l_cw_word in p_cw_words:
        if l_cw_word[2] >= l_min_length and '-' in l_cw_word[4]:
            pattern = re.compile('^' + l_cw_word[4].replace('.', '%').replace('-', '.').upper() + '$', re.UNICODE)
                l_choice = {}  # using dict instead of list

            for l_word in [w for w in p_words if len(w) == len(l_cw_word[4])]:
                if re.match(pattern, l_word):

                    l_choice[l_word]=None

            l_choices[l_choice]=None

            if len(l_choice) < l_min:  ##
                l_min_index = l_index  ## Get rid of this.
                l_min = len(l_choice)  ##
        else:
            l_choices.append([])    # why append empty list?
        l_index = l_index + 1
        l_choices=list(l_choices.keys())   # ...you probably need the list again...
    return (l_choices, l_min_index)
share|improve this answer
    
Are you saying that dicts are faster than lists? –  Superdooperhero Feb 26 '13 at 22:05
    
quite a bit :-) in the post: stackoverflow.com/questions/513882/… the computational complexity is explained, where searching through lists grow linearly with the lists' length. Dicts, in contrast, have constant lookup time. –  BHM Feb 26 '13 at 22:08
    
PS. You will get some error message for the changes I made in your text, but it should get you going. –  BHM Feb 26 '13 at 22:13
    
You can use a dict as a key to another dict? –  Superdooperhero Feb 26 '13 at 22:15
    
Would sets not have the same speed improvement and be easier to use since it does not require the association? –  Superdooperhero Feb 26 '13 at 22:27

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