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I want to find the prime number between 0 and a long variable but I am not able to get any output.

The program is

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication16
{
    class Program
    {
        void prime_num(long num)
        {
            bool isPrime = true;
            for (int i = 0; i <= num; i++)
            {
                for (int j = 2; j <= num; j++)
                {
                    if (i != j && i % j == 0)
                    {
                        isPrime = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if (isPrime)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine ( "Prime:" + i );
                }
                isPrime = true;
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            p.prime_num (999999999999999L);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Can any one help me out and find what is the possible error in the program?

share|improve this question
    
Which project template was used to create this project. –  Alexandre Brisebois Oct 2 '09 at 15:10
1  
Homework alert !! –  whatnick Oct 2 '09 at 15:13
8  
Probably homework, nothing wrong with that as long as the asker has tried to answer the homework problem and is stuck on a specific issue (as seems to be the case here). –  Eric J. Oct 2 '09 at 15:15
2  
How long will this thing actually take? 999999999999999L is quite a big number? –  Guillermo Phillips Oct 2 '09 at 15:31
1  
@George Stocker: I know. I was asking if it can be undone. –  SLaks Oct 2 '09 at 17:27
show 6 more comments

19 Answers

up vote 50 down vote accepted

You can do this faster using a nearly optimal trial division sieve in one (long) line like this:

Enumerable.Range(0, Math.Floor(2.52*Math.Sqrt(num)/Math.Log(num))).Aggregate(
    Enumerable.Range(2, num-1).ToList(), 
    (result, index) => { 
        var bp = result[index]; var sqr = bp * bp;
        result.RemoveAll(i => i >= sqr && i % bp == 0); 
        return result; 
    }
);

The approximation formula for number of primes used here is π(x) < 1.26 x / ln(x). We only need to test by primes not greater than x = sqrt(num).

Note that the sieve of Eratosthenes has much better run time complexity than trial division (should run much faster for bigger num values, when properly implemented).

share|improve this answer
5  
Why was this downvoted? It answers the question (How can I make this better?) –  SLaks Oct 2 '09 at 15:20
6  
It looks like the OP has a specific homework assignment. If he submits your solution, the instructor will consider it cheating. –  Jon B Oct 2 '09 at 15:24
4  
Yes, amazing that the principle was first described over 2000 years ago. –  UpTheCreek Oct 2 '09 at 15:24
16  
And the instructor will be quite right to. Using any other answer can also be called cheating. However, it still answers the question. –  SLaks Oct 2 '09 at 15:25
2  
Doesn't this have close to quadratic complexity? Eratosthenes is a different algorithm and is much faster than this. –  Accipitridae Oct 7 '09 at 18:13
show 28 more comments

Try this:

void prime_num(long num)
{

    // bool isPrime = true;
    for (long i = 0; i <= num; i++)
    {
        bool isPrime = true; // Move initialization to here
        for (long j = 2; j < i; j++) // you actually only need to check up to sqrt(i)
        {
            if (i % j == 0) // you don't need the first condition
            {
                isPrime = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (isPrime)
        {
            Console.WriteLine ( "Prime:" + i );
        }
        // isPrime = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 complete solution with more efficient search and proper loop variables. –  whatnick Oct 2 '09 at 15:27
    
You could make this faster by keeping track of the primes and only trying to divide by those. –  NickLarsen Oct 2 '09 at 17:52
2  
Definitely - this just fixes the original program - there are plenty of better ways to generate primes. In fact, I maintain a table in a database, makes project Euler problems a lot easier when you can solve them in declarative SQL. –  Cade Roux Oct 2 '09 at 18:13
    
+1 a proper fix (almost) for the problem: there wasn't "any output" because of using num upper limit in the inner loop; this answer changes it to the inefficient, but not insane, i. Obviously the intent of the program is just to print a steady stream of primes, not to print them all... And the original code didn't print any because of the insane test 1%2, 1%3, ... 1%(10^15-1) which were of course all non-zero, so eventually it would report 1 as prime. One more thing: this code here does report 0 and 1 as primes though. :) i should start from 2 too. –  Will Ness Apr 18 '12 at 21:26
    
@WillNess, as you say there was a problem with the question code in that it would do an insane number of ridiculous prime checks, the real reason that the question code didn't produce any output at all is actually the mixing of long range check limit variables and integer loop variables (automatically extended to long for the comparison) which cause is exactly as the questioner experienced: the inner checking loop never exits because the range of the loop variable is less than the range checked, thus no output is ever produced. –  GordonBGood Dec 30 '13 at 9:35
show 6 more comments

Smells like more homework. My very very old graphing calculator had a is prime program like this. Technnically the inner devision checking loop only needs to run to i^(1/2). Do you need to find "all" prime numbers between 0 and L ? The other major problem is that your loop variables are "int" while your input data is "long", this will be causing an overflow making your loops fail to execute even once. Fix the loop variables.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, the mixing of long limit variables and integer loop variables will cause is exactly as the questioner experienced: the loop variable (automatically extended to a long for the comparison) is less than the range checked as designated by the long variable. This makes the inner 'j' loop test all numbers up to int.MaxValue (two billion plus) then roll over to starting at int.MinValue (negative two billion minus) and when that loop variable 'j' gets back up to -1, the loop will break out because all numbers are evenly divisible by -1, thus classed as non-prime and no results are output. –  GordonBGood Dec 31 '13 at 2:38
add comment

You only need to check odd divisors up to the square root of the number. In other words your inner loop needs to start:

for (int j = 3; j <= Math.Sqrt(i); j+=2) { ... }

You can also break out of the function as soon as you find the number is not prime, you don't need to check any more divisors (I see you're already doing that!).

This will only work if num is bigger than two.

No Sqrt

You can avoid the Sqrt altogether by keeping a running sum. For example:

int square_sum=1;
for (int j=3; square_sum<i; square_sum+=4*(j++-1)) {...}

This is because the sum of numbers 1+(3+5)+(7+9) will give you a sequence of odd squares (1,9,25 etc). And hence j represents the square root of square_sum. As long as square_sum is less than i then j is less than the square root.

share|improve this answer
    
sqrt(i), actually. –  Cade Roux Oct 2 '09 at 15:21
    
Thanks just spotted that myself. –  Guillermo Phillips Oct 2 '09 at 15:25
    
j should start from 1 if you wanted to increment j by 2. Otherwise, you are checking j=2, 4, 6, ... –  David Oct 2 '09 at 15:25
    
I should be less hasty. Although 3 would be better for num>2. –  Guillermo Phillips Oct 2 '09 at 15:26
    
You can do j < Math.Sqrt(i) safely because if an integer was the sqrt, it obviously wouldn't be prime. This would only affect runtime for a small number of cases however. –  NickLarsen Oct 2 '09 at 17:59
show 4 more comments

People have mentioned a couple of the building blocks toward doing this efficiently, but nobody's really put the pieces together. The sieve of Eratosthenes is a good start, but with it you'll run out of memory long before you reach the limit you've set. That doesn't mean it's useless though -- when you're doing your loop, what you really care about are prime divisors. As such, you can start by using the sieve to create a base of prime divisors, then use those in the loop to test numbers for primacy.

When you write the loop, however, you really do NOT want to us sqrt(i) in the loop condition as a couple of answers have suggested. You and I know that the sqrt is a "pure" function that always gives the same answer if given the same input parameter. Unfortunately, the compiler does NOT know that, so if use something like '<=Math.sqrt(x)' in the loop condition, it'll re-compute the sqrt of the number every iteration of the loop.

You can avoid that a couple of different ways. You can either pre-compute the sqrt before the loop, and use the pre-computed value in the loop condition, or you can work in the other direction, and change i

That's probably adequate for the size of numbers you're dealing with -- a 15 digit limit means the square root is 7 or 8 digits, which fits in a pretty reasonable amount of memory. On the other hand, if you want to deal with numbers in this range a lot, you might want to look at some of the more sophisticated prime-checking algorithms, such as Pollard's or Brent's algorithms. These are more complex (to put it mildly) but a lot faster for large numbers.

There are other algorithms for even bigger numbers (quadratic sieve, general number field sieve) but we won't get into them for the moment -- they're a lot more complex, and really only useful for dealing with really big numbers (the GNFS starts to be useful in the 100+ digit range).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting summary of prime algorithms, made me wikipedia and wolfram for a bit. Would love this post edited to include links. –  whatnick Oct 3 '09 at 4:22
    
You are not quite correct as to "do NOT want to use sqrt(i) in the loop condition" as there are ways to make that clear to both the compiler and the code reader by computing the limit once outside the actual loop range check as I did in my answer. –  GordonBGood Dec 30 '13 at 9:49
add comment

It may just be my opinion, but there's another serious error in your program (setting aside the given 'prime number' question, which has been thoroughly answered).

Like the rest of the responders, I'm assuming this is homework, which indicates you want to become a developer (presumably).

You need to learn to compartmentalize your code. It's not something you'll always need to do in a project, but it's good to know how to do it.

Your method prime_num(long num) could stand a better, more descriptive name. And if it is supposed to find all prime numbers less than a given number, it should return them as a list. This makes it easier to seperate your display and your functionality.

If it simply returned an IList containing prime numbers you could then display them in your main function (perhaps calling another outside function to pretty print them) or use them in further calculations down the line.

So my best recommendation to you is to do something like this:

public void main(string args[])
{
    //Get the number you want to use as input
    long x = number;//'number' can be hard coded or retrieved from ReadLine() or from the given arguments

    IList<long> primes = FindSmallerPrimes(number);

    DisplayPrimes(primes);
}

public IList<long> FindSmallerPrimes(long largestNumber)
{
    List<long> returnList = new List<long>();
    //Find the primes, using a method as described by another answer, add them to returnList
    return returnList;
}

public void DisplayPrimes(IList<long> primes)
{
    foreach(long l in primes)
    {
        Console.WriteLine ( "Prime:" + l.ToString() );
    }
}

Even if you end up working somewhere where speration like this isn't needed, it's good to know how to do it.

share|improve this answer
2  
Although other people have answered this question, I find your answer to be quite useful to the OP in the sense that it teaches him a little bit about separation of concerns in programming. +1 –  Hallaghan Jan 25 '11 at 17:28
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First step: write an extension method to find out if an input is prime

public static bool isPrime(this int number ) {

    for (int i = 2; i < number; i++) { 
        if (number % i == 0) { 
            return false; 
        } 
    }

    return true;   
}

2 step: write the method that will print all prime numbers that are between 0 and the number input

public static void getAllPrimes(int number)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < number; i++)
    {
        if (i.isPrime()) Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
your isPrime will return true for 0, 1, and for any negative number. So the loop inside getAllPrimes should start from int i = 2; , at least. –  Will Ness Apr 18 '12 at 21:55
    
the return true should be inside the bracket, many thanks i will amend –  Bamara Coulibaly May 3 '12 at 22:31
    
no, no, the return true; should be the next statement after the for statement, as it is right now (just the text indentation isn't right). but the function isPrime as written, assumes 2 <= number. In other cases it won't work properly. So wherever you use it, make sure you test a number greater than 1 with it. It is a sensible choice too, since no number less than 2 is a prime, so need to check those numbers. That means, just change your starting value for i in the loop of getAllPrimes, to start not from 0, but from 2. If not, your program will show 0 and 1 as prime numbers. –  Will Ness May 4 '12 at 7:27
    
typo: "so no need to check those numbers" (under 2) for primality. –  Will Ness May 4 '12 at 8:56
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One line code in C# :-

Console.WriteLine(String.Join(Environment.NewLine, 
    Enumerable.Range(2, 300)
        .Where(n => Enumerable.Range(2, (int)Math.Sqrt(n) - 1)
        .All(nn => n % nn != 0)).ToArray()));                                    
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    public static void Main()
    {  
        Console.WriteLine("enter the number");
        int i = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

        for (int j = 2; j <= i; j++)
        {
            for (int k = 2; k <= i; k++)
            {
                if (j == k)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}is prime", j);

                    break;
                }
                else if (j % k == 0)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        Console.ReadLine();          
    }
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static void Main(string[] args)
    {  int i,j;
        Console.WriteLine("prime no between 1 to 100");
    for (i = 2; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (j = 1; j <= i; j++)
        {

            if (i % j == 0)
            { count=count+1; }
        }

        if ( count <= 2)
        { Console.WriteLine(i); }


    }
    Console.ReadKey();

    }
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The Sieve of Eratosthenes answer above is not quite correct. As written it will find all the primes between 1 and 1000000. To find all the primes between 1 and num use:

private static IEnumerable Primes01(int num)
{
    return Enumerable.Range(1, Convert.ToInt32(Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(num))))
        .Aggregate(Enumerable.Range(1, num).ToList(),
        (result, index) =>
            {
                result.RemoveAll(i => i > result[index] && i%result[index] == 0);
                return result;
            }
        );
}

The seed of the Aggregate should be range 1 to num since this list will contain the final list of primes. The Enumerable.Range(1, Convert.ToInt32(Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(num)))) is the number of times the seed is purged.

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class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        foreach (var prime in Extensions.Primes(1000))
            Console.WriteLine(prime);
    }
}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<long> Primes(this long number)
    {
        long sievebound = (number - 1) / 2; // last index of sieve
        bool[] sieve = new bool[sievebound + 1];
        int crosslimit = (int)((Math.Sqrt(number) - 1) / 2);
        for (int i = 1; i <= crosslimit; i++)
        {
            if (!sieve[i]) // 2*i+1 is prime, mark multiples
            {
                for (int j = 2 * i * (i + 1); j <= sievebound; j += 2 * i + 1)
                    sieve[j] = true;
            }
        }

        yield return 2;
        for (int i = 1; i < sievebound; i++)
        {
            if (!sieve[i])
                yield return 2 * i + 1;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
note for a casual reader: ((2*i+1)^2-1) div 2 = 2*i*(i+1). –  Will Ness Dec 8 '13 at 13:09
    
will it work for 999999999999999L upper limit though, as the OP asked?.... –  Will Ness Dec 8 '13 at 13:19
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EDIT_ADD: If Will Ness is correct that the question's purpose is just to output a continuous stream of primes for as long as the program is run (pressing Pause/Break to pause and any key to start again) with no serious hope of every getting to that upper limit, then the code should be written with no upper limit argument and a range check of "true" for the first 'i' for loop. On the other hand, if the question wanted to actually print the primes up to a limit, then the following code will do the job much more efficiently using Trial Division only for odd numbers, with the advantage that it doesn't use memory at all (it could also be converted to a continuous loop as per the above):

static void primesttt(ulong top_number) {
  Console.WriteLine("Prime:  2");
  for (var i = 3UL; i <= top_number; i += 2) {
    var isPrime = true;
    for (uint j = 3u, lim = (uint)Math.Sqrt((double)i); j <= lim; j += 2) {
      if (i % j == 0)  {
        isPrime = false;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (isPrime) Console.WriteLine("Prime:  {0} ", i);
  }
}

First, the question code produces no output because of that its loop variables are integers and the limit tested is a huge long integer, meaning that it is impossible for the loop to reach the limit producing an inner loop EDITED: whereby the variable 'j' loops back around to negative numbers; when the 'j' variable comes back around to -1, the tested number fails the prime test because all numbers are evenly divisible by -1 END_EDIT. Even if this were corrected, the question code produces very slow output because it gets bound up doing 64-bit divisions of very large quantities of composite numbers (all the even numbers plus the odd composites) by the whole range of numbers up to that top number of ten raised to the sixteenth power for each prime that it can possibly produce. The above code works because it limits the computation to only the odd numbers and only does modulo divisions up to the square root of the current number being tested.

This takes an hour or so to display the primes up to a billion, so one can imagine the amount of time it would take to show all the primes to ten thousand trillion (10 raised to the sixteenth power), especially as the calculation gets slower with increasing range. END_EDIT_ADD

Although the one liner (kind of) answer by @SLaks using Linq works, it isn't really the Sieve of Eratosthenes as it is just an unoptimised version of Trial Division, unoptimised in that it does not eliminate odd primes, doesn't start at the square of the found base prime, and doesn't stop culling for base primes larger than the square root of the top number to sieve. It is also quite slow due to the multiple nested enumeration operations.

It is actually an abuse of the Linq Aggregate method and doesn't effectively use the first of the two Linq Range's generated. It can become an optimized Trial Division with less enumeration overhead as follows:

static IEnumerable<int> primes(uint top_number) {
  var cullbf = Enumerable.Range(2, (int)top_number).ToList();
  for (int i = 0; i < cullbf.Count; i++) {
    var bp = cullbf[i]; var sqr = bp * bp; if (sqr > top_number) break;
    cullbf.RemoveAll(c => c >= sqr && c % bp == 0);
  } return cullbf; }

which runs many times faster than the SLaks answer. However, it is still slow and memory intensive due to the List generation and the multiple enumerations as well as the multiple divide (implied by the modulo) operations.

The following true Sieve of Eratosthenes implementation runs about 30 times faster and takes much less memory as it only uses a one bit representation per number sieved and limits its enumeration to the final iterator sequence output, as well having the optimisations of only treating odd composites, and only culling from the squares of the base primes for base primes up to the square root of the maximum number, as follows:

static IEnumerable<uint> primes(uint top_number) {
  if (top_number < 2u) yield break;
  yield return 2u; if (top_number < 3u) yield break;
  var BFLMT = (top_number - 3u) / 2u;
  var SQRTLMT = ((uint)(Math.Sqrt((double)top_number)) - 3u) / 2u;
  var buf = new BitArray((int)BFLMT + 1,true);
  for (var i = 0u; i <= BFLMT; ++i) if (buf[(int)i]) {
      var p = 3u + i + i; if (i <= SQRTLMT) {
        for (var j = (p * p - 3u) / 2u; j <= BFLMT; j += p)
          buf[(int)j] = false; } yield return p; } }

The above code calculates all the primes to ten million range in about 77 milliseconds on an Intel i7-2700K (3.5 GHz).

Either of the two static methods can be called and tested with the using statements and with the static Main method as follows:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

static void Main(string[] args) {
  Console.WriteLine("This program generates prime sequences.\r\n");

  var n = 10000000u;

  var elpsd = -DateTime.Now.Ticks;

  var count = 0; var lastp = 0u;
  foreach (var p in primes(n)) { if (p > n) break; ++count; lastp = (uint)p; }

  elpsd += DateTime.Now.Ticks;
  Console.WriteLine(
    "{0} primes found <= {1}; the last one is {2} in {3} milliseconds.",
    count, n, lastp,elpsd / 10000);

  Console.Write("\r\nPress any key to exit:");
  Console.ReadKey(true);
  Console.WriteLine();
}

which will show the number of primes in the sequence up to the limit, the last prime found, and the time expended in enumerating that far.

EDIT_ADD: However, in order to produce an enumeration of the number of primes less than ten thousand trillion (ten to the sixteenth power) as the question asks, a segmented paged approach using multi-core processing is required but even with C++ and the very highly optimized PrimeSieve, this would require something over 400 hours to just produce the number of primes found, and tens of times that long to enumerate all of them so over a year to do what the question asks. To do it using the un-optimized Trial Division algorithm attempted, it will take super eons and a very very long time even using an optimized Trial Division algorithm as in something like ten to the two millionth power years (that's two million zeros years!!!).

It isn't much wonder that his desktop machine just sat and stalled when he tried it!!!! If he had tried a smaller range such as one million, he still would have found it takes in the range of seconds as implemented.

The solutions I post here won't cut it either as even the last Sieve of Eratosthenes one will require about 640 Terabytes of memory for that range.

That is why only a page segmented approach such as that of PrimeSieve can handle this sort of problem for the range as specified at all, and even that requires a very long time, as in weeks to years unless one has access to a super computer with hundreds of thousands of cores. END_EDIT_ADD

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Try removing the "break", it seems to me that it takes you out of the inner for loop prematurely.

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Very similar - from an exercise to implement Sieve of Eratosthenes in C#:

public class PrimeFinder
{
    readonly List<long> _primes = new List<long>();

    public PrimeFinder(long seed)
    {
        CalcPrimes(seed);
    }

    public List<long> Primes { get { return _primes; } }

    private void CalcPrimes(long maxValue)
    {
        for (int checkValue = 3; checkValue <= maxValue; checkValue += 2)
        {
            if (IsPrime(checkValue))
            {
                _primes.Add(checkValue);
            }
        }
    }

    private bool IsPrime(long checkValue)
    {
        bool isPrime = true;

        foreach (long prime in _primes)
        {
            if ((checkValue % prime) == 0 && prime <= Math.Sqrt(checkValue))
            {
                isPrime = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        return isPrime;
    }
}
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Prime Helper very fast calculation

public static class PrimeHelper
{

    public static IEnumerable<Int32> FindPrimes(Int32 maxNumber)
    {
        return (new PrimesInt32(maxNumber));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Int32> FindPrimes(Int32 minNumber, Int32 maxNumber)
    {
        return FindPrimes(maxNumber).Where(pn => pn >= minNumber);
    }

    public static bool IsPrime(this Int64 number)
    {
        if (number < 2)
            return false;
        else if (number < 4 )
            return true;

        var limit = (Int32)System.Math.Sqrt(number) + 1;
        var foundPrimes = new PrimesInt32(limit);

        return !foundPrimes.IsDivisible(number);
    }

    public static bool IsPrime(this Int32 number)
    {
        return IsPrime(Convert.ToInt64(number));
    }

    public static bool IsPrime(this Int16 number)
    {
        return IsPrime(Convert.ToInt64(number));
    }

    public static bool IsPrime(this byte number)
    {
        return IsPrime(Convert.ToInt64(number));
    }
}

public class PrimesInt32 : IEnumerable<Int32>
{
    private Int32 limit;
    private BitArray numbers;

    public PrimesInt32(Int32 limit)
    {
        if (limit < 2)
            throw new Exception("Prime numbers not found.");

        startTime = DateTime.Now;
        calculateTime = startTime - startTime;
        this.limit = limit;
        try { findPrimes(); } catch{/*Overflows or Out of Memory*/}

        calculateTime = DateTime.Now - startTime;
    }

    private void findPrimes()
    {
        /*
        The Sieve Algorithm
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes
        */
        numbers = new BitArray(limit, true);
        for (Int32 i = 2; i < limit; i++)
            if (numbers[i])
                for (Int32 j = i * 2; j < limit; j += i)
                     numbers[j] = false;
    }

    public IEnumerator<Int32> GetEnumerator()
    {
        for (Int32 i = 2; i < 3; i++)
            if (numbers[i])
                yield return i;
        if (limit > 2)
            for (Int32 i = 3; i < limit; i += 2)
                if (numbers[i])
                    yield return i;
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    // Extended for Int64
    public bool IsDivisible(Int64 number)
    {
        var sqrt = System.Math.Sqrt(number);
        foreach (var prime in this)
        {
            if (prime > sqrt)
                break;
            if (number % prime == 0)
            {
                DivisibleBy = prime;
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    private static DateTime startTime;
    private static TimeSpan calculateTime;
    public static TimeSpan CalculateTime { get { return calculateTime; } }
    public Int32 DivisibleBy { get; set; }
}
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ExchangeCore Forums have a good console application listed that looks to write found primes to a file, it looks like you can also use that same file as a starting point so you don't have to restart finding primes from 2 and they provide a download of that file with all found primes up to 100 million so it would be a good start.

The algorithm on the page also takes a couple shortcuts (odd numbers and only checks up to the square root) which makes it extremely efficient and it will allow you to calculate long numbers.

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U can use the normal prime number concept must only two factors (one and itself). So do like this,easy way

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
namespace PrimeNUmber
{
    class Program
    {
        static void FindPrimeNumber(long num)
        {
            for (long i = 1; i <= num; i++)
            {
                int totalFactors = 0;
                for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++)
                {
                    if (i % j == 0)
                    {
                        totalFactors = totalFactors + 1;
                    }
                }
                if (totalFactors == 2)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(i);
                }
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            long num;
            Console.WriteLine("Enter any value");
            num = Convert.ToInt64(Console.ReadLine());
            FindPrimeNumber(num);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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so this is basically just two typos, one, the most unfortunate, for (int j = 2; j <= num; j++) which is the reason for the unproductive testing of 1%2,1%3 ... 1%(10^15-1) which goes on for very long time so the OP didn't get "any output". It should've been j < i; instead. The other, minor one in comparison, is that i should start from 2, not from 0:

for( i=2; i <= num; i++ )
{
    for( j=2; j < i; j++ ) // j <= sqrt(i) is really enough
....

Surely it can't be reasonably expected of a console print-out of 28 trillion primes or so to be completed in any reasonable time-frame. So, the original intent of the problem was obviously to print out a steady stream of primes, indefinitely. Hence all the solutions proposing simple use of sieve of Eratosthenes are totally without merit here, because simple sieve of Eratosthenes is bounded - a limit must be set in advance.

What could work here is the optimized trial division which would save the primes as it finds them, and test against the primes, not just all numbers below the candidate.

Second alternative, with much better complexity (i.e. much faster) is to use a segmented sieve of Eratosthenes. Which is incremental and unbounded.

Both these schemes would use double-staged production of primes: one would produce and save the primes, to be used by the other stage in testing (or sieving), much above the limit of the first stage (below its square of course - automatically extending the first stage, as the second stage would go further and further up).

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