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Let's say I have a function:

isOne :: Int -> Int -> Int
isOne x y =

Then if x == 1 and y != 1 then it returns 1 (one of the parameters equals 1), if x == 1 and y == 1 it returns 2 (because both are 1), if x != 1 and y != 1 it returns 0 etc.

I can't figure out how to do more than a single check with an if statement (or using cases).

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4  
isOne a b = let f 1=1; f _=0 in f a + f b –  Niklas B. Feb 26 '13 at 23:37
1  
isOne a b = length . filter (==1) $ [a,b] generalizes quite handily to more arguments. –  yatima2975 Feb 27 '13 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The easiest way to this is with pattern matches. You can define a function by cases, which are interpreted in the order at which they occur

isOne 1 1 = 2
isOne 1 _ = 1
isOne _ 1 = 1
isOne _ _ = 0

alternatively, you can use guards

isOne x y | (x == 1) && (y == 1) = 2
          | (x == 1) && (y != 1) = 1
          | (x != 1) && (y == 1) = 1
          | otherwise            = 0

again, these are checked from top to bottom. That is, if the first guard matches then it goes with the first equation, otherwise it tries the second, and so on. This can also be written

isOne x y | (x == 1) && (y == 1) = 2
isOne x y | (x == 1) && (y != 1) = 1
isOne x y | (x != 1) && (y == 1) = 1
isOne x y | otherwise            = 0

or

isOne x y | (x == 1) && (y == 1) = 2
isOne x y | (x == 1) || (y == 1) = 1
isOne x y | otherwise            = 0

another way of doing it would be to use an if then else expression.

isOne x y = if (x == 1) && (y == 1) 
            then 2 
            else if (x == 1) || (y == 1) then 1 else 0

or perhaps you could try doing

isOne x y = (go x) + (go y) where
   go 1 = 1
   go _ = 0

or any of dozens of other ways...

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1  
Looks like I'll sue you for copyright violation :) –  Ingo Feb 26 '13 at 23:38
    
@Ingo Yep. I would have been first if I hadn't edited the question. :) –  Philip JF Feb 26 '13 at 23:43
    
What if I need to count values that are ABOVE another value. For instance, find out how many parameters are above '4' for instance? Also it's not just 2 parameters, let's say it's 3? –  burrito burrito Feb 27 '13 at 6:26
    
You can replace x == 1 with x > 1 or similar... –  MathematicalOrchid Feb 27 '13 at 21:39

Why, you just need to translate your english to Haskell:

if (x==1) && (y /= 1) then 1
else if (x/=1) && (y==1) then 1
...

But you really want:

isOne 1 1 = 2
isOne 1 _ = 1
isOne _ 1 = 1
isOne _ _ = 0

or, even shorter:

isOne x y = fromEnum (x==1) + fromEnum (y==1)
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lol "Why, you just need to translate your english to Haskell." Isn't that always true? –  askewchan Feb 27 '13 at 1:22
    
Yes, sure, @askewchan :) –  Ingo Feb 27 '13 at 9:20

Method 1

Use paired case statements

isOne x y = case (x, y) of 
  (1, 1) -> 2
  (1, _) -> 1
  (0, 0) -> 0
  ...

Method 2

Use nested if statements

isOne x y = if x == 1 then (if y == 1 then 2 else 1) else 0
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I'd second using either direct pattern matching in the function definition, or case on tuples.

But the most readable alternative would IMO be length [ q | q<-[x,y], q==1 ].

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