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I'm working on an HTTP Server and I'm using Indy's TIdHTTPWebBrokerBridge with a TWebModule. I'm encapsulating all the Server functionality into a single Component, and this includes the Indy Server component and its corresponding Web Module. However, I'm having some issues figuring out how to make the Web Module know the Component from which it was called.

Suppose I have this component:

type
  TMyComponent = class(TComponent)
  private
    FServer: TIdHTTPWebBrokerBridge;
  end;

implementation

uses
  MyWebModule;

I do know I have to initialize this by setting the Request Handler, and I've taken care of it by adding an initialization section to this unit:

initialization
  if WebRequestHandler <> nil then
    WebRequestHandler.WebModuleClass:= WebModuleClass;

Then I have the Web Module class in a separate unit:

uses
  MyWebServer;

type
  TMyWebModule = class(TWebModule)
  private
    FOwner: TMyComponent;
  end;

Note the private field I have in this web module FOwner: TMyComponent. This is where I'm having trouble figuring out where to go. How do I assign this to its appropriate owner? The Web Module is automatically created and managed by the Indy HTTP Server, so as far as I know, I don't have any control to set such a thing.

The reason why I need to have access to its owner is because I have properties set there which the Web Module needs to be able to read. For example, one property I have on my component is RootDir which is a root directory where to read/write files. I need to be able to read this property from within the Web Module.

How can I make the Web Module able to read its owner component's properties? Or in general, how can I assign this private field FOwner to the instance of my component from where it was instantiated?

share|improve this question
    
Why is it important to know who called it? What is it doing with that information? I tend to follow the mantra caller can know a lot about what it calls, but the one called should never need to know anything about who is calling it. Helps to keep stuff decoupled. – Marjan Venema Feb 27 '13 at 7:00
    
Sound like a problem you can't have if you use xxm.sf.net – Stijn Sanders Feb 27 '13 at 9:55
    
@Marjan I usually do keep stuff decoupled, but in this scenario how else is the Web Module supposed to know its settings? Since it's all wrapped inside this component, and the component's properties is where this information is primarily stored, how else could the Web Module know these settings? I believe my answer below is the only legitimate solution for this scenario. And in my case, the two units are directly related to each other, so they don't need to be decoupled, they're meant for each other. – Jerry Dodge Feb 27 '13 at 15:42
    
What we have is a TWebModule descendant which just dispatches stuff and the unit register our class with the WebRequestHandler. Then we have a THTTPServer which aggregates (just like you do but in a normal class not a component) the webbrokerbridge. The bridge is created with nil as its owner and immediately after the bridge is created, we register our webmodule descendant in it using the RegisterWebModuleClass method of the bridge's ancestor TIdHTTPWebBrokerBridge. Works like a charm... :) – Marjan Venema Feb 28 '13 at 7:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I discovered my answer a while after asking this question

Since it's not advised to create multiple instances of TIdHTTPWebBrokerBridge, you don't necessarily need to worry about the existence of multiple different instances of TMyComponent. You do however need to perform your own checking to make sure multiple instances don't exist in the first place. But since you only have one instance of this Component, you can feel safe declaring a global variable in your component's unit and exposing it to your web module.

Don't just declare a global var variable directly in the interface of your unit. Instead, you should protect this...

function MyComponent: TMyComponent;

implementation

uses
  MyWebModule;

var
  _MyComponent: TMyComponent;

function MyComponent: TMyComponent;
begin
  Result:= _MyComponent;
end;

constructor TMyComponent.Create(AOwner: TComponent);
begin
  inherited;
  _MyComponent:= Self;
end;

destructor TMyComponent.Destroy;
begin
  _MyComponent:= nil;
  inherited;
end;

initialization
  _MyComponent:= nil;
  if WebRequestHandler <> nil then
    WebRequestHandler.WebModuleClass:= WebModuleClass;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
On a side note, it's also not advised to wrap this Indy component in a component in such a way, but I'm doing it anyway. Another solution would be to not expose the component at all, leave it private, and add InitMyServer and UnInitMyServer procedures. – Jerry Dodge Feb 27 '13 at 1:00

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