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When I drop some variables from a DataFrame, the returned dataframe is as I expect except the index.name is removed. Why would this be?

Example:

test = pd.DataFrame([[1,2,3],[3,4,5],[5,6,7]], index=['a','b','c'], columns=['d','e','f'])
test

Out[20]:
second  d   e   f
first           
a   1   2   3
b   3   4   5
c   5   6   7
#test.index.name = first
#test.columns.name=second
In [27]:

test.drop(['b'])

Out[27]:
second  d   e   f
a   1   2   3
c   5   6   7

After 'b' is dropped the returned dataframe (index.name) is no longer 'first' but None.

Q1. Is it because the .drop() method returns a dataframe that has a new index object which by default would have no name?
Q2. Is there anyway to preserve the index.name during drop operations as the new index is still correctly named - it is just a subset of the original index

Expected Output would be:

 Out[20]:
    second  d   e   f
    first           
    a   1   2   3
    c   5   6   7
share|improve this question
    
do you mean you want to drop the 'b' row but keep the 'b' label for the row with [5,6,7]? –  askewchan Feb 27 '13 at 0:40
    
No I would like to drop the 'b' row but keep the entire Index in the new dataframe as the same name as before. (i.e. a,c would be named 'first') –  sanguineturtle Feb 27 '13 at 0:44
    
Please edit your question to include your expected or desired output. –  askewchan Feb 27 '13 at 0:45
    
I think it's confusing to use the word label in the context you mean. I think you mean you want to keep the index name –  Zelazny7 Feb 27 '13 at 0:45
    
Updated to remove label and use name. Yes - index.name is what I am referring to. Thanks. –  sanguineturtle Feb 27 '13 at 0:48

1 Answer 1

One way to achieve the intended behavior is:

row_name = test.index.name
test = test.drop('b')
test.index.name = row_name

But this isn't ideal.

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