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I'm trying to make a class that uses a header (.h) file and a source (.cpp) file. I've come across this error that I can't seem to resolve:

Error: "Menu::Menu(int w, int h)" provides no initializer for:

Here is my code:
Header:

//Menu.h:
#ifndef MENU_H
#define MENU_H

#include <StdAfx.h>
#include <objidl.h>
#include <gdiplus.h>
#include <windows.h>

using namespace Gdiplus;
#pragma comment (lib,"Gdiplus.lib")

class Menu
{
public:
    Menu(int w, int h);
    void render();
    void checkInput(int x, int y, int message);
    void setWidth(int w);
    void setHeight(int h);
    void setOpenWidth(int w);
    void setOpenHeight(int h);
    void setPosX(int x);
    void setPosY(int y);
    void setDraggablePaneColor(Color c);
    void setContentPaneColor(Color c);
    void setCornerButtonColorInactive(Color c);
    void setCornerButtonColorActive(Color c);
    void setTextColor(Color c);
    void setBorderColor(Color c);

private:

    //Position variables:

    //window position variables
    int posX;
    int posY;

    //drag offset variables
    int dragX;
    int dragY;


    //Width and height variables:

    //width and height of draggable pane
    int width;
    int height;

    //width and height of content pane
    int widthOpen;
    int heightOpen;


    //States

    //menu open states
    bool menuOpen;

    //corner button hover states
    bool cornerButtonHover;
    bool cornerButtonWasHovering;

    //dragging state
    bool dragging;
    //left mouse button down state
    bool lmbDown;


    //Colors

    //draggable pane color
    Color draggablePaneColor;
    //content pane color
    Color contentPaneColor;
    //inactive button color (not hovering)
    Color cornerButtonColorInactive;
    //active button color (hovering)
    Color cornerButtonColorActive;
    //text color
    Color textColor;
    //border color
    Color borderColor;


    //Constants

    //corner button text
    const wchar_t cornerButtonText[][3];
    //corner button length
    const int cornerButtonLength;


    //Content

    //element content[];
};
#endif

Source:

//Menu.cpp
#include "Menu.h"

Menu::Menu(int w, int h)
{

}

int posX = 0;
int posY = 0;

//drag offset variables
int dragX = 0;
int dragY = 0;


//Width and height variables:

//width and height of draggable pane
int width = 150;
int height = 20;

//width and height of content pane
int widthOpen = 150;
int heightOpen = 200;


//States

//menu open states
bool menuOpen = true;

//corner button hover states
bool cornerButtonHover = false;
bool cornerButtonWasHovering = false;

//dragging state
bool dragging = false;
//left mouse button down state
bool lmbDown = false;


//Colors

//draggable pane color
Color draggablePaneColor = Color(60, 60, 60);
//content pane color
Color contentPaneColor = Color(80, 80, 80);
//inactive button color (not hovering)
Color cornerButtonColorInactive = Color(60, 60, 60);
//active button color (hovering)
Color cornerButtonColorActive = Color(70, 70, 70);
//text color
Color textColor = Color::White;
//border color
Color borderColor = Color::Black;


//Constants

//corner button text
const wchar_t cornerButtonText[][3] = {L"+", L"-", L"X"};
//corner button length
const int cornerButtonLength = height - 4;


//Content

//element content[];
void Menu()
{

}
share|improve this question
2  
There may be some complex variables in Menu that need to be initialized. Please post the whole class or at least to the line that the compiler is referring to. –  Thomas Matthews Feb 27 '13 at 0:55
    
I suspect your code that you have posted is missing the critical reference that you have as part of "Menu", which would be what you need an "initializer for". Unfortunately, I think I can speak for all of us when I say "We can't really guess what the code is that you haven't posted...". Please make a complete example that compiles that shows the problem. –  Mats Petersson Feb 27 '13 at 0:55
    
I've updated the post so it shows all of my code so far. –  user1803542 Feb 27 '13 at 1:00
    
What's the constructor for Color look like? –  tadman Feb 27 '13 at 1:04
    
#tadman I'm using GDI+. These are the constructors for Color: pastebin.com/9TCeds5w –  user1803542 Feb 27 '13 at 1:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

const members must be explicitly initialized in the constructor. You were probably thinking that you are already doing that, but you are not. Your code:

Menu::Menu(int w, int h)
{

}

int posX = 0;
int posY = 0;
...

defines an empty constructor, and afterwards defines new variables at file scope. The posX created by int posX = 0; has nothing to do with Menu::posX. To properly initialize member variables in a constructor, you need to use the following:

Menu::Menu(int w, int h)
{
   posX = 0;
   posY = 0;
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
So would this work?Menu::Menu(int w, int h) { const wchar_t cornerButtonText[][3] = {L"+", L"-", L"X"}; const int cornerButtonLength = height - 4; } –  user1803542 Feb 27 '13 at 1:21
    
No, that's a definition of a new variable in the scope of the constructor. –  us2012 Feb 27 '13 at 1:22
    
what about this? Menu::Menu(int w, int h) { Menu::cornerButtonText[][3] = {L"+", L"-", L"X"}; Menu::cornerButtonLength = height - 4; } –  user1803542 Feb 27 '13 at 1:25
    
No need for the scope resolution, see my edit to the answer. (If I may suggest so, read a proper book. This stuff is the very basics of using classes.) –  us2012 Feb 27 '13 at 1:26

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