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I have two matrices: B with size 9x100x51 and K with size 34x9x100. I want to multiply all of K(34) with each one of B(9) so as to have a final matrix G with size 34x9x100x51.

For example: the element G(:,5,60,25) is composed as follow

G(:,5,60,25)=K(:,5,60)*B(5,60,25).

I hope that the example helps to understand what I want to do. Thank you

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do this with nested loops, although it probably won't be terribly fast:

B = rand(9,100,51);
K = rand(34,9,100);

G = nan(34,9,100,51)

for ii = 1:size(B,1)
  for jj = 1:size(B,2);
    for kk = 1:size(B,3)
      G(:, ii, jj, kk) = K(:,ii,jj) .* B(ii,jj,kk);
    end
  end
end

Its been a long day and my brain is a bit fried, kudos to anyone who can improve this!

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Thank you very much!!! It works and it is fast. – Kostas Feb 27 '13 at 1:35
    
@Kostas, then please vote up and/or accept this answer – slayton Feb 27 '13 at 2:20
    
@slayton I came up with a couple increasingly vectorized solutions that were faster (tested on octave online as I don't have matlab currently). Would be curious as to the speed difference that you see, if you feel like testing them on your machine. – tmpearce Feb 27 '13 at 6:28

Any time you find yourself writing nested loops in matlab, there's a good chance you can speed up quite a bit using the built-in vectorized forms of the functions. The code ends up being quite a bit shorter typically too (but often less immediately clear to a reader, so comment your code!).

In this case, does avoiding the nested loops make a difference? Absolutely! Let's get to work. @slayton has provided a 3-loop solution. We can get faster.

Restating the problem a bit, B has 51 9x100 matrices and K has 34 9x100 matrices. For each combination of 51x34, you want to element-wise multiply the respective 9x100 matrices from B and K.

Element-wise multiplication is a great job for bsxfun, so we can conceptually reduce this problem to working along two dimensions (the third dimension of B, first dimension of K):

Initial, two-loop solution:

B = rand(9,100,51);
K = rand(34,9,100);
G = nan(34,9,100,51);

for b=1:size(B,3)
    for k=1:size(K,1)
        G(k,:,:,b) = bsxfun(@times,B(:,:,b), squeeze(K(k,:,:)));
    end
end

Ok, two loops is making progress. Can we do better? Well, let's recognize that the matrices B and K can be replicated along the appropriate dimensions, then element-wise multiplied all at once.

B = rand(9,100,51);
K = rand(34,9,100);

B2 = repmat(permute(B,[4 1 2 3]), [size(K,1) size(B)]);
K2 = repmat(K, [size(K) size(B,3)]);

G = bsxfun(@times,B2,K2);

So, how do the solutions compare speed-wise? I tested the on the octave online utility, and didn't include the time to generate the initial B and K matrices. I did include the time to preallocate the G matrix for the solutions that needed preallocation. The code is below.

3 loops (@slayton's answer): 4.024471 s
2 loop solution: 1.616120 s
0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution: 1.211850 s
0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution, no temporaries: 0.605838 s

Caveat: The timing may depend quite a bit on your machine, I wouldn't trust the online utility for great timing tests. Changing the order of when the loops were executed (even taking care not to reuse variables and mess up time of allocation) did change things a bit, namely the 2-loop solution was sometimes as fast as the no-loop solution with temporaries stored. However, the more vectorized you can get, the better you will be.

Here's the code for the speed test:

B = rand(9,100,51);
K = rand(34,9,100);

tic
G1 = nan(34,9,100,51);

for ii = 1:size(B,1)
  for jj = 1:size(B,2);
    for kk = 1:size(B,3)
      G1(:, ii, jj, kk) = K(:,ii,jj) .* B(ii,jj,kk);
    end
  end
end
t=toc;
printf('Time for 3 loop solution: %f\n' ,t)

tic
G2 = nan(34,9,100,51);

    for b=1:size(B,3)
        for k=1:size(K,1)
            G2(k,:,:,b) = bsxfun(@times,B(:,:,b), squeeze(K(k,:,:)));
        end
    end
t=toc;
printf('Time for 2 loop solution: %f\n' ,t)
tic

B2 = repmat(permute(B,[4 1 2 3]), [size(K,1) 1 1 1]);
    K2 = repmat(K, [1 1 1 size(B,3)]);

    G3 = bsxfun(@times,B2,K2);
t=toc;
printf('Time for 0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution: %f\n' ,t)

tic

    G4 = bsxfun(@times,repmat(permute(B,[4 1 2 3]), [size(K,1) 1 1 1]),repmat(K, [1 1 1 size(B,3)]));
t=toc;
printf('Time for 0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution, no temporaries: %f\n' ,t)


disp('Are the results equal?')
isequal(G1,G2)
isequal(G1,G3)

Time for 3 loop solution: 4.024471
Time for 2 loop solution: 1.616120
Time for 0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution: 1.211850
Time for 0-loop repmat/bsxfun solution, no temporaries: 0.605838
Are the results equal?
ans =  1
ans =  1    
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