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I am trying to implement an FIR filter in Verilog. I have predetermined the coefficients in MATLAB. But I am not sure whether the registers will propagate properly with this code.

module fir_filter(
  input clock,
  input reset,
  input wire[15:0] input_sample,
  output reg[15:0] output_sample);

parameter N = 13;
reg signed[15:0] coeffs[12:0];
reg [15:0] holderBefore[12:0];
wire [15:0] toAdd[12:0];

always @(*)
begin
    coeffs[0]=6375;
    coeffs[1]=1;
    coeffs[2]=-3656;
    coeffs[3]=3;
    coeffs[4]=4171;
    coeffs[5]=4;
    coeffs[6]=28404;
    coeffs[7]=4;
    coeffs[8]=4171;
    coeffs[9]=3;
    coeffs[10]=-3656;
    coeffs[11]=1;
    coeffs[12]=6375;
end

genvar i;

generate
for (i=0; i<N; i=i+1)
    begin: mult
        multiplier mult1(
          .dataa(coeffs[i]),
          .datab(holderBefore[i]),
          .result(toAdd[i]));
    end
endgenerate

always @(posedge clock or posedge reset)
begin
    if(reset)
        begin
            holderBefore[12]    <= 0;
            holderBefore[11]    <= 0;
            holderBefore[10]    <= 0;
            holderBefore[9]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[8]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[7]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[6]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[5]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[4]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[3]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[2]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[1]     <= 0;
            holderBefore[0]     <= 0;
            output_sample       <= 0;
        end
    else
        begin               
            holderBefore[12]    <= holderBefore[11];
            holderBefore[11]    <= holderBefore[10];
            holderBefore[10]    <= holderBefore[9];
            holderBefore[9]     <= holderBefore[8];
            holderBefore[8]     <= holderBefore[7];
            holderBefore[7]     <= holderBefore[6];
            holderBefore[6]     <= holderBefore[5];
            holderBefore[5]     <= holderBefore[4];
            holderBefore[4]     <= holderBefore[3];
            holderBefore[3]     <= holderBefore[2];
            holderBefore[2]     <= holderBefore[1];
            holderBefore[1]     <= holderBefore[0];
            holderBefore[0]     <= input_sample;
            output_sample <= (input_sample + toAdd[0] + toAdd[1] + 
                              toAdd[2] + toAdd[3] + toAdd[4] + toAdd[5] +
                              toAdd[6] + toAdd[7] + toAdd[8] + toAdd[9] + 
                              toAdd[10] + toAdd[11] + toAdd[12]);
        end
end



endmodule

Is this the best way to implement this? is there a better way to do the addition?

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Also resources that would help are also greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Area and power efficient FIR/IIR filters are the holy grail for some.

Using generate statements you have instantiated 13 multipliers. Multipliers take up quite a lot of area. It is common to only instantiate one and time multiplex it (TDM). In this case supply a clock (tick) 13 times faster than the required output rate.

Your adder chain while looking valid again is going to be very big and could lead to timing problems as there could be very long ripple chains. Breaking this down over multiple cycles might result in lower area and power.

If you combine the multiplication of a sample with the addition you will have a more typical MAC architecture (Multiply Accumulate).

I would also avoid initialising constants in an always @* as no right hand sides of arguments change this may not trigger the sensitivity list.

For these I would use localparams, or if going down the TDM route I would create a Look up table (LUT).

always @* begin
  case( program_counter )
    0 : coeff = 6375;
    1 : coeff = 1   ;
    ...
  endcase
end
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Assuming your choice of filter response is justified (5.2dB ripple!)

Then an approach is to tradeoff some response accuracy for reduced chip resources by using Canonical signed digit representation [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canonical_signed_digit] to approximate each coefficient. This Strength reduction [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strength_reduction] (compiler term) allows efficient shifts ie routing and adds to be used instead of expensive multiplies.

Then due to the symmetry of the coefficients the respective samples can be summed before applying the coefficient, which significantly drops the required chip resources.[1]

But then there is likely to be common factors in the coefficients implemented, which for a chip target may get some optimisation but for firmware significant improvements can be made.

[1] = DSP Tricks: An odd way to build a simplified FIR filter structure Richard G. Lyons

try http://www.embedded.com/design/embedded/4008837/DSP-Tricks-An-odd-way-to-build-a-simplified-FIR-filter-structure

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