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Eclipse 4 gives a warning which says the stmt may potentially not be closed and cause a resource leak:

class Test {
    public void test() {
        PreparedStatement stmt = null;
        try {
            stmt = HibernateSession.instance().connection().prepareStatement("");
        } catch (final SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            if (stmt != null)
                try {
                    stmt.close();
                } catch (final SQLException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
        }
    }
}

Under which circumstance would that happen?

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1  
that's not the worst Eclipse bug –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 27 '13 at 1:18
1  
@OlegMikheev that's not a bug, that's a feature. And I don't mean this sarcastically, it's actually a useful feature. –  djechlin Feb 27 '13 at 1:22
1  
And here's one of many duplicates: stackoverflow.com/questions/11786637/… –  djechlin Feb 27 '13 at 1:23
1  
I can't see how stmt would not be closed but the connection won't ever be closed. –  Adrian Pronk Feb 27 '13 at 1:25
2  
Eclipse is not smarter than you, that's all. –  irreputable Feb 27 '13 at 2:05
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4 Answers 4

You need to be using Java 7's try with resources or a try-finally block:

try(stmt = HibernateSession.instance().connection().prepareStatement("")) {


}

This warning will be generated on types that inherit from AutoCloseable that are not guaranteed to be closed. (Or possible Closeable, I forget which).

Now that I see what you're asking, just write less complicated code.

Foo f = null; // don't do this, but it's what you're doing
f = new Foo();

Is what you're doing, and you found one of several situations where you actually have to pay a penalty for this extraneous work.

Furthermore your try/finally should be clean. .close() can't throw, why are you catching?

try { // don't do this
    stmt.close();
}
catch(SQLException exc) {

}

Should generate an Eclipse warning telling you that you're catching something that doesn't throw. That might even be a compile error, not sure, but sounds like you would benefit from playing with Eclipse > Preferences > Compiler and reviewing what warnings are intelligent. If you don't understand a warning, google it and see if it would be helpful to you, don't just skip over it. (sort of like you did with this one).

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1  
thanks, that would make the code much clearer. I wish my employer would adapt jdk 1.7. –  user972946 Feb 27 '13 at 1:24
1  
1  
@OlegMikheev my bad, I implicitly assumed the AutoCloseable class was designed correctly (I've made this mistake in Java before). –  djechlin Feb 27 '13 at 2:40
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A leak is possible if an exception is thrown when you call stmt.close() in the finally block.

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1  
and how do you handle such a leak? –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 27 '13 at 1:36
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The problem was that in your finally block an exception might potentially occur, which would prevent stmt from closing.

One workaround is that you can replace everything in the finally block with:

JDBCUtilities.close(stmt);

See the docs for JDBCUtilities.close. As you can see, no exception will be thrown using this utility method so you don't need to worry about resource leak. One additional benefit is that the utility method handles the null case for stmt as well so we don't need to code it ourselves.

Actually, it is good practice to use JDBCUtilities.

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It'll confuse Eclipse even more, which cannot possibly know what JDBCUtilities.close(stmt) does. –  irreputable Feb 27 '13 at 2:04
    
@irreputable How? Eclipse only checks for syntactic errors, checked exceptions, etc. I don't think it cares about or understands the business logic. In the finally block we want to close stmt which is exactly what JDBCUtilities.close does. –  Terry Li Feb 27 '13 at 2:19
    
Eclipse does not know that JDBCUtilities.close(stmt) calls stmt.close() –  irreputable Feb 27 '13 at 2:23
    
@irreputable I don't think Eclipse needs to know that. Can you give an example where it might complain? –  Terry Li Feb 27 '13 at 2:28
    
I mean Eclipse would issue the same warning, since it doesn't know the stmt is closed for sure. –  irreputable Feb 27 '13 at 2:29
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I guess the conclusion here is: this is an Eclipse bug?

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1  
Looks like an Eclipse bug to me. Maybe Eclipse sees that there is a path through the finally (when stmt is null) that causes stmt.close() not to be called. –  Alex Feb 28 '13 at 22:57
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