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I'm having a hard time understanding how buffered channels work. Based on the following example, i'm trying to utilize 2 threads at a time to print out the current time, with approximately 2 second delays between every 2 go calls:

package main
import "fmt"
import "time"

func main() {
    returnCurrentTime := func() string  {
        return time.Now().String()
    }

    c := make(chan string, 2)

    asyncReturnCurrentTime := func(c chan string) {
        time.Sleep(2001 * time.Millisecond)
        c <- returnCurrentTime()
    }

    for i := 1; i != 7; i++ {
        go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
        if(i % 3 == 0) {
            fmt.Println(<- c)
            fmt.Println(<- c)
            fmt.Println(<- c)
            fmt.Println()
        }
    }
}

This produces

2013-02-27 03:17:50
2013-02-27 03:17:50
2013-02-27 03:17:50

2013-02-27 03:17:52
2013-02-27 03:17:52
2013-02-27 03:17:52

What i'm expecting regarding the seconds is 2 second delays between ever 2 go calls and in this case the following result

2013-02-27 03:17:50
2013-02-27 03:17:50
2013-02-27 03:17:52 <- 3rd call with 2 buffer slots

2013-02-27 03:17:54
2013-02-27 03:17:54
2013-02-27 03:17:56 <- 3rd call with 2 buffer slots

Obviously i misunderstood the concept of buffered channels, would somebody please be kind enough to explain the fault in my logic and how to achieve the expected result?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
You have more then two "threads". In this case each go routines acting like a thread so at one point you are running three go routines plus the main thread so that is four "threads". –  masebase Feb 27 '13 at 2:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Effectively, you are running:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    returnCurrentTime := func() string {
        return time.Now().String()
    }

    c := make(chan string, 2)

    asyncReturnCurrentTime := func(c chan string) {
        time.Sleep(2001 * time.Millisecond)
        c <- returnCurrentTime()
    }

    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println()
    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    go asyncReturnCurrentTime(c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println(<-c)
    fmt.Println()
}

Output:

2013-02-26 21:28:22.069581655 -0500 EST
2013-02-26 21:28:22.069688722 -0500 EST
2013-02-26 21:28:22.069695217 -0500 EST

2013-02-26 21:28:24.070985411 -0500 EST
2013-02-26 21:28:24.070999309 -0500 EST
2013-02-26 21:28:24.071002661 -0500 EST

Send statements

Both the channel and the value expression are evaluated before communication begins. Communication blocks until the send can proceed.

The returnCurrentTime() expression (the timestamp) is evaluated immediately, before an attempt is made to send. It's not a timestamp for the send. The send may happen later if the buffer is full.

Also, measuring actual send and receive times, the buffering delay for chan c is going to be inconsequential: send, send, block, receive, unblock, send. For example,

c <-;  2013-02-26 23:29:34.505456624 -0500 EST
c <-;  2013-02-26 23:29:34.505467030 -0500 EST
<- c;  2013-02-26 23:29:34.505468497 -0500 EST
c <-;  2013-02-26 23:29:34.505518015 -0500 EST

c <-;  2013-02-26 23:31:36.506659943 -0500 EST
c <-;  2013-02-26 23:31:36.506664832 -0500 EST
<- c;  2013-02-26 23:31:36.506669302 -0500 EST
c <-;  2013-02-26 23:31:36.506696540 -0500 EST
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the channel buffer limit "2" restrict to 2 maximum calls before receive? If not, what is the point of the buffer limit ? –  Dante Feb 27 '13 at 2:39
    
You need to understand exactly what your timestamp represents. See my revised answer. –  peterSO Feb 27 '13 at 3:07

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