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I'm having trouble with fstream not writing to my file when it is located in a specific place. In the following code when the commented line is uncommented the file is written to, however when it is commented the file is not written to at all. I've added a bunch of console output and it says both of the outputs around the "outputFile << newWord << endl;" are completed but the file is never actually written to.

void write_index( string newWord )
{
fstream outputFile( "H:\\newword.txt", ios::app );
int same = 0;
string currWord;
currWord.resize(5);
//outputFile << newWord << endl;
while( !outputFile.eof() )
{
    getline( outputFile, currWord );
    cout << "Checking if " << newWord << "is the same as " << currWord << endl;
    if( newWord == currWord )
    {
        cout << "It is the same" << endl;
        same = 1;
        break;
    }
}
if( same != 1 )
{
    cout << "Writing " << newWord << "to file" << endl;
    outputFile << newWord << endl;
    cout << "Done writing" << endl;
}
outputFile.close();

}

share|improve this question
2  
" ios::app: All output operations are performed at the end of the file, appending the content to the current content of the file - this flag can only be used in streams open for output-only operations". So how exactly is getline going to work on an output-only file? –  paxdiablo Feb 27 '13 at 2:43
    
I was not aware of this but that makes sense, is there an alternative to read from a file before appending to it? I'm trying to check all lines above the line about to be written to check if there are any equal lines and if there are, the line isn't written. –  user1560249 Feb 27 '13 at 2:48
    
Open it for read/write then scan through it looking for the duplicate. If not found, simply set the file pointer to the end of the file and write it. Unfortunately being more of a C guy, I know about fopen(?,"a+") and fseek but not the C++ equivalents off the top of my head. –  paxdiablo Feb 27 '13 at 2:52
    
Well I was messing around and I got it working. I made the function above return "same" as an integer then put the modified conditional back into the main function immediately after the function call and it seems to be working. So now the write_index function only reads using an ifstream and I just opened an ofstream in the main function. –  user1560249 Feb 27 '13 at 2:59
    
"getline( outputFile,"? "Get"? "output"? This is suspicious! –  Johnsyweb Feb 27 '13 at 3:05

1 Answer 1

I'm somewhat confident you're looking for something along these lines:

void write_index( const string& newWord )
{
    fstream outputFile( "H:\\newword.txt", ios::in);
    bool same = false;

    if (outputFile)
    {
        string currWord;
        while (getline(outputFile, currWord))
        {
            cout << "Checking if " << newWord << " is the same as " << currWord << endl;
            same = (newWord == currWord);
            if (same)
            {
                cout << "It is the same" << endl;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    if (!same)
    {
        outputFile.close();
        outputFile.open("H:\\newword.txt", ios::app);

        cout << "Writing " << newWord << "to file" << endl;
        outputFile << newWord << endl;
        cout << "Done writing" << endl;
    }

    outputFile.close();
}

There are better ways to do this, but that will likely be a decent place to start.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you may want app in the second open since you otherwise lose all the data currently in the file. And, though I'm not a C++ guru, do you need to close the output file before re-opening? –  paxdiablo Feb 27 '13 at 2:57
    
@paxdiablo You're quite correct, sir. Thank you. –  WhozCraig Feb 27 '13 at 2:58

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