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I have two files one is a 'master list' with IP and host information and the other is dynamically filled with IP and user agent string. see example below.

Example file 1:

24.143.206.32   Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/5.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0)
66.39.66.63     Dalvik/1.6.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.1; Nexus 7 Build/JOP40D)

Example file 2:

24.143.206.32 # New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745
66.39.66.63 # New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745
and on and on

I need to find the IP matches between the two AND output matches with the trailing info of BOTH.

24.143.206.32 Browser: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/5.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0) LOCATION: New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745

66.39.66.63  Browser: Dalvik/1.6.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.1; Nexus 7 Build/JOP40D) LOCATION: New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745

Currently I am using this for the IP match:

awk 'FNR==NR{ a[$1]=$0;next } ($1 in a)' file1 file2 > matchesfile

I have tried over and over and just can't get all the info I need. Can you provide any help or is this too complex? I'm not sure the direction to take with this.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is how I'd do it:

  • For every line, store the IP address from the first field and remove it from the line.
  • For each line in the first file, store browser details in an array keyed by the IP address .
  • For each line in any subsequent file, if the IP address is found in the array, print a formatted string with the IP address, the browser associated with it and whatever else is on that line.

Example:

% awk ' {
    IP = $1
    $1 = ""
}
FNR == NR {
    browser[IP] = $0
}
FNR != NR && IP in browser {
    printf "%s Browser:%s Location:%s\n", IP, browser[IP], $0
}
' file[12]
24.143.206.32 Browser: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/5.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0) Location: # New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745
66.39.66.63 Browser: Dalvik/1.6.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.2.1; Nexus 7 Build/JOP40D) Location: # New Host US,city,44.8824996948,-99.6440963745
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1  
The poster wants to augment the output with the words Browser: and LOCATION: before the text from each file that follows the IP address. –  Ed Morton Feb 27 '13 at 3:21
1  
This one ended up working exactly as I needed!! Thank you!!!! I might play with spacing and format a little but this was it! –  sectech Feb 27 '13 at 4:12
    
@sectech: Great news. Happy to help. –  Johnsyweb Feb 27 '13 at 6:39
    
When there are no matches found its printing the quoted information. Is there a way I can make only print when theres a match(content) –  sectech Mar 4 '13 at 2:54
    
@sectech: I can't see how that would happen. This code specifically checks when processing subsequent files that the IP address was found in the first file. If the input doesn't match that in your question, then you'll need to add a checks to the program to ensure that the first field is an IP address and that the rest of the line contains some useful text. –  Johnsyweb Mar 4 '13 at 3:04
awk '
FNR==NR{ a[$1]=$0; next }
$1 in a {
   sub(/[[:space:]]+/,"&Browser: ",a[$1])
   sub(/[^[:space:]]+[[:space:]]+#/,"LOCATION:")
   print a[$1], $0
}
' file1 file2 > matchesfile
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This combined multiple ip and info after along the same lines, it was a strange format. I decided to use above just because it worked with minimal changes, but thank you! –  sectech Feb 27 '13 at 4:13

If you want the data from both output, then you need to print the information, and test slightly differently, I think:

awk 'FNR == NR { a[$1] = $0; next }
     { if ($1 in a) print $0 " " a[$1] }' file1 file2 > matchesfile

That's pretty close to what you had; the printing is different, though. You invoked print $0 implicitly. With GNU awk at least, you can use the conditional as the pattern:

awk 'FNR == NR { a[$1] = $0; next }
     ($1 in a) { print $0 " " a[$1] }' file1 file2 > matchesfile

And if you want to get the 'Browser:' and 'Location:' tags into the output, then it requires altogether more work:

awk 'FNR == NR { for (i = 2; i < NF; i++) a[$1] = a[$i] " " $i; next }
     ($1 in a) { for (i = 2; i < NF; i++) loc = loc " " $i;
                 print $1 " Browser: " a[$1] " Location: " loc }
    ' file1 file2 > matchesfile

The first for loop concatenates the browser fields from file1 after the IP address into a[$1]. The second for loop does the same for the location information from file2 into variable loc. The print then spits out the data. You can fine-tiune the formatting to suit your requirements.

And there are other ways to achieve the same result...

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thanks this one is formatted kind of strange so I used below answer. It was formatted with minimal changes, but thank you! still learning alot! –  sectech Feb 27 '13 at 4:14
awk 'FNR==NR{f=$1;$1=$2="";a[f]=$0;next}($1 in a ){$2="Browser: "$2;print $0,a[$1]}' file2 file1
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