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Given input in the form of

fifteen,7,fourth-four,2,1,six
66,eight-six,99,eighteen
6,5,4,3,2,1

What can I use to read this into a format that I can then parse? The goal is to be able to sort the numbers and then print them back out, in order, in the same format that they were given to me. For example, the following should be printed as

    1,2,six,7,fifteen,forty-four
    eighteen,66,eighty-six,99
    1,2,3,4,5,6

I have an idea of how the sorting should be done, I'm just having trouble figuring out the best way to read in the input. Currently, I'm using just doing this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    char word;
    char arr[20];

    int count = 0;

    while (cin >> word) {
        if (word == '\n') {
            cout << "Newline detected.";
        }
        cout << "Character at: " << count << " is " << word << endl;
        count++;
    }
}

This does not work, because there is never a \n read in.

share|improve this question
    
I thought you were reading from a file? –  CLearner Feb 27 '13 at 3:58
    
I'm doing it via stdin and stdout. ./a.out < input_file.txt > output.txt –  Linell Feb 27 '13 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

IMO the easiest way to do it would be to use std::istream's getline function with the ',' as the delimiter.

E.g. Something like.

char dummystr[256];
int count = 0;
while (cin.getline(dummystr, 256, ',')) {
    cout << "Character at: " << count << " is " << dummystr << endl;
    ++count;
}

For newline delimiters with comma delimiters on each line (you really should just pick one):

char dummystr[256]; // not max size for the string
int count = 0;
while (cin.getline(dummystr, 256, '\n')) {
    std::stringstream nested(dummystr);
    char dummystr2[256];
    while (nexted.getline(dummystr2, 256, ',')) {
        cout << "Character at: " << count << " is " << dummystr << endl;
        ++count;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is working mostly. The only problem is on the end of each line, where I believe it's reading in forty-four\n66. Is there a simple way to delimit on two items? –  Linell Feb 27 '13 at 3:33
    
Just read this cplusplus.com/reference/istream/istream/getline –  Viet Feb 27 '13 at 4:39
    
You should pick if you are using a ',' or a \n as a delimiter. Otherwise you'll have to do somewhat more interesting parsing. Perhaps it's worth pointing out that you can use a stringstream if you get something into string form: –  john.pavan Feb 27 '13 at 4:52
    
Well, this is part of a question that I missed at a programming competition because I didn't know how to parse the strings correctly, so I'm trying to get that part down. I think that two delimiters was part of the challenge of it. –  Linell Feb 27 '13 at 13:40

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