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I have a little problem while doing some assignment work due in about 10 hours.

I am supposed create a function has-vowels? which consumes a strings and returns true or false depending on if the string has a vowel or not.

Example (has-vowels? "wow") -> true (has-vowels? "nwtfg) -> false

So here is what I did,

(define vowel-list (cons #\A 
               (cons #\a 
               (cons #\E 
               (cons #\e
               (cons #\I 
               (cons #\i
               (cons #\O 
               (cons #\o 
               (cons #\U
               (cons #\u empty)))))))))))

(define (a-vowel? vowels)
  (cond ((empty? vowels) true)
    ((member (first vowels) vowel-list) true)
    (else false )))

(define (has-vowels? word)
  (a-vowel? (string->list word)))

the problem is "oio" is true and "www" is false but mixed strings such as "wow" is also false?

any hints or tips?

thanks!

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4 Answers

You aren't checking the rest of the word, only the first letter. So "oio" works because o is a vowel, "www" fails because w is not and "wow" also fails because w is not a vowel.

As a hint you need to modify what happens when the list is not empty and the first letter is not a vowel. Currently you just return false.

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Your code doesn't make any sense. First, you have to explain the base case. If it is empty it should return false.

(empty? vowels) true) is wrong. Here you are saying that it should return true if it is empty which is incorrect.

Also as mentioned above by Warwick Masson you only testing for the first letter. To test for the other letter you have to use recursion on the other items in the list keep iterating until you have gone through all the letters.

Good luck!

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Here is the complete solution:

;; contains-vowel? : string -> boolean
;; checks whether a string contains a vowel.
(define (contains-vowel? a-string)
  (local (;; A list of vowels
          (define vowel-list 
           (list #\A #\a #\E #\e #\I #\i #\O #\o #\U #\u))
          ;; split-string : string -> (listof string-pieces)
          ;; converts a string into a list of string pieces.
          (define (split-string a-string)
            (string->list a-string))
          ;; has-vowel? : string-piece -> booleal
          ;; checks whether a string-piece is a vowel
          (define (has-vowel? string-piece vowels)
            (cond ((empty? vowels) false)
                  ((equal? string-piece (first vowels)) true)
                  (else (has-vowel? string-piece (rest vowels)))))
          ;; contains-vowel-list : (listof string-pieces) -> boolean
          ;; determines whether any items on a list of string-pieces
          ;; contains a piece that represents a vowel.
          (define (contains-vowel-list losp)
            (cond ((empty? losp) false)
                  ((false? (has-vowel? (first losp) vowel-list))
                   (contains-vowel-list (rest losp)))
                  (else (has-vowel? (first losp) vowel-list)))))
          (contains-vowel-list (split-string a-string))))
;; Test
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hellk") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hhllo") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "ellhh") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hhhssdd") false)

I'm assuming by your use of cons you may not yet be allowed to use local expressions or the list abbreviation. This solution may be more appropriate for your homework:

;; A list of vowels
(define vowel-list (cons #\A 
           (cons #\a 
           (cons #\E 
           (cons #\e
           (cons #\I 
           (cons #\i
           (cons #\O 
           (cons #\o 
           (cons #\U
           (cons #\u empty)))))))))))
;; split-string : string -> (listof string-pieces)
;; converts a string into a list of string pieces.
(define (split-string a-string)
  (string->list a-string))
;; Test
(check-expect (split-string "ja") (cons #\j (cons #\a empty)))
;; has-vowel? : string-piece -> boolealn
;; checks whether a string-piece is a vowel
(define (has-vowel? string-piece vowels)
  (cond ((empty? vowels) false)
        ((equal? string-piece (first vowels)) true)
        (else (has-vowel? string-piece (rest vowels)))))
;; Test
(check-expect (has-vowel? #\i vowel-list) true)
(check-expect (has-vowel? #\x vowel-list) false)
;; contains-vowel-list : (listof string-pieces) -> boolean
;; determines whether any items on a list of string-pieces
;; contains a piece that represents a vowel, from a list of vowels.
(define (contains-vowel-list losp)
  (cond ((empty? losp) false)
        ((false? (has-vowel? (first losp) vowel-list))
         (contains-vowel-list (rest losp)))
        (else (has-vowel? (first losp) vowel-list))))
;; Test
(check-expect (contains-vowel-list (cons #\h (cons #\i empty))) true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel-list (cons #\h (cons #\h empty))) false)
;; contains-vowel? : string -> boolean
;; checks whether a string contains a vowel.
(define (contains-vowel? a-string)
  (contains-vowel-list (split-string a-string)))
;; Test
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hellk") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hhllo") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "ellhh") true)
(check-expect (contains-vowel? "hhhssdd") false)
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Are you restricted to use some specific functions? You can use regexp for that kind of things.

(define vowels? 
 (lambda (list-to-evaluate)
   (if (list? (regexp-match-positions #rx"[AaEeIiOoUu]" (list->string list-to-evaluate)))
       #t
       #f
  )))

Of course (list-to-evaluate) Has the form

(#\A #\p #\p #\l #\e)

Otherwise you can change

list-to-evaluate

To a simple string "Hello World" for example.

(vowels? '(#\A #\p #\p #\l #\e)) ==> true
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