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I'm trying to figure out the best way to determine whether I'm in the last iteration of a loop over a map in order to do something like the following:

for (iter = someMap.begin(); iter != someMap.end(); ++iter) {
    bool last_iteration;
    // do something for all iterations
    if (!last_iteration) {
        // do something for all but the last iteration
    }
}

There seem to be several ways of doing this: random access iterators, the distance function, etc. What's the canonical method?

Edit: no random access iterators for maps!

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+1: Good question! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 8 '11 at 12:56

12 Answers 12

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Canonical? I can't claim that, but I'd suggest

final_iter = someMap.end();
--final_iter;
if (iter != final_iter) ...

Edited to correct as suggested by KTC. (Thanks! Sometimes you go too quick and mess up on the simplest things...)

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Reminds everyone how post-decrement work again? ;-) –  KTC Sep 29 '08 at 22:59
1  
CAVEAT: It requires bi-directional iterators, so it doesn't work in all STL collection classes. –  Euro Micelli Sep 29 '08 at 23:08
3  
You could just compare with the value at rbegin() –  Jeff Yates Sep 29 '08 at 23:25
1  
@ffpf, you can't because comparisons between forward iterators and reverse iterators don't work. –  cdleary Sep 29 '08 at 23:43
2  
Unless the map changes inside the loop, final_iter should be evaluated outside it. In this case, the map must be checked for emptiness, lest we run into the feared undefined behaviour. –  Gorpik Apr 4 '09 at 15:03

If you just want to use a ForwardIterator, this should work:

for ( i = c.begin(); i != c.end(); ) {
        iterator cur = i++;
        // do something, using cur
        if ( i != c.end() ) {
                // do something using cur for all but the last iteration
        }
}
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This seems like the simplest:

bool last_iteration = iter == (--someMap.end());
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Do iterators actually define arithmetic plus with integers? I didn't think so; but even if some of them do, I'm certain you couldn't rely on it for every container. –  Daniel Spiewak Sep 29 '08 at 22:48
    
This doesn't work... there's no match for the [iterator type] + int operator! –  cdleary Sep 29 '08 at 22:51
    
Bi-directional iterators (what map has) does not have + defined to manipulate it. –  KTC Sep 29 '08 at 22:56
    
Code fixed... too late :) –  Torlack Sep 29 '08 at 22:59
1  
@Tim: If it's an empty collection we'll never enter the loop body. :-) –  cdleary Jan 29 '09 at 20:56

Modified Mark Ransom's so it actually work as intended.

finalIter = someMap.end();
--finalIter;
if (iter != final_iter)
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Why was KTC's marked down? It is more correct than Mark's. –  Torlack Sep 29 '08 at 23:00
    
It wasn't marked down. The questioner merely changed his/her mind on the accepted answer. –  KTC Sep 29 '08 at 23:02
    
Thanks for the correction, I gave you an upvote for it. –  Mark Ransom Sep 29 '08 at 23:16

Surprised no one mentioned it yet, but of course boost has something ;)

Boost.Next (and the equivalent Boost.Prior)

Your example would look like:

for (iter = someMap.begin(); iter != someMap.end(); ++iter) {
    // do something for all iterations
    if (boost::next(iter) != someMap.end()) {
        // do something for all but the last iteration
    }
}
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The following code would be optimized by a compiler so that to be the best solution for this task by performance as well as by OOP rules:

if (&*it == &*someMap.rbegin()) {
    //the last iteration
}

This is the best code by OOP rules because std::map has got a special member function rbegin for the code like:

final_iter = someMap.end();
--final_iter;
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#include <boost/lambda/lambda.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace boost::lambda;

// call the function foo on each element but the last...
if( !someMap.empty() )
{
  std::for_each( someMap.begin(), --someMap.end(), bind( &Foo, _1 ) );
}

Using std::for_each will ensure that the loop is tight and accurate... Note the introduction of the function foo() which takes a single argument (the type should match what is contained in someMap). This approach has the added addition of being 1 line. Of course, if Foo is really small, you can use a lambda function and get rid of the call to &Foo.

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This doesn't allow to "do something for all iterations" –  Gianluca Dec 8 '11 at 13:11

A simple, yet effective, approach:

  size_t items_remaining = someMap.size();

  for (iter = someMap.begin(); iter != someMap.end(); iter++) {
    bool last_iteration = items_remaining-- == 1;
  }
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Here's my optimized take:

iter = someMap.begin();

do {
    // Note that curr = iter++ may involve up to three copy operations
    curr = iter;

    // Do stuff with curr

    if (++iter == someMap.end()) {
        // Oh, this was the last iteration
        break;
    }

    // Do more stuff with curr

} while (true);
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Why to work to find the EOF so that you dont give something to it.

Simply, exclude it;

for (iter = someMap.begin(); someMap.end() - 1; ++iter) {
    //apply to all from begin to second last element
}

KISS (KEEP IT SIMPLY SIMPLE)

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Full program:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>

void process(int ii)
{
   std::cout << " " << ii;
}

int main(void)
{
   std::list<int> ll;

   ll.push_back(1);
   ll.push_back(2);
   ll.push_back(3);
   ll.push_back(4);
   ll.push_back(5);
   ll.push_back(6);

   std::list<int>::iterator iter = ll.begin();
   if (iter != ll.end())
   {
      std::list<int>::iterator lastIter = iter;
      ++ iter;
      while (iter != ll.end())
      {
         process(*lastIter);
         lastIter = iter;
         ++ iter;
      }
      // todo: think if you need to process *lastIter
      std::cout << " | last:";
      process(*lastIter);
   }

   std::cout << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

This program yields:

 1 2 3 4 5 | last: 6
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You can just pull an element out of the map prior to iteration, then perform your "last iteration" work out of the loop and then put the element back into the map. This is horribly bad for asynchronous code, but considering how bad the rest of C++ is for concurrency, I don't think it'll be an issue. :-)

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Maps ARE ordered - maybe you're thinking of a hash? –  Mark Ransom Sep 29 '08 at 22:51
    
I was under the impression that Maps were implemented by default using hashtables. I will correct the answer. Thanks! –  Daniel Spiewak Sep 29 '08 at 23:39

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