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While writing a Blackjack script, I've come across some confusion on how I should use 'if', 'elif', and 'else' statements. I looked at most of the posts on the subject here, googled it, but am still confused. . .I did learn that if 'elif' is used instead of repeating 'if' statements, the code will short circuit when the (or one of the) 'elif' statements evaluates to True. This has actually confused me more (although I understand the concept of what happens when using 'elif' and shortcircuiting). The first 5 'if' statement illustrates this. Had I used 'elif' instead of 'if', the code may never reach the last condition if both player and dealer hit 21. . .After this though, it seems I could have used 'elif' statements or just leave it the way it is. . .So, my question is, did I use them correctly in the rest of main()? If not, how would you do it? Thank you very much.

# current working version - - - 02/26/2013
# Notes: Nees to fix Ace problem. Ace can be 11 or 1.

import random
import os

def main():
    print "Welcome To Python Blackjack. [H] Is For A Hit, [S] Is To Stand, [Q] To       Quit.\n"
    c = ""    # Hit, Stand or Quit Variable.
    player = deal_cards()    # deal player
    dealer = deal_cards()    # deal dealer
    print "< ---- Player Hand ---->"
    print "Player Hand: ", player    
    print "Total Player Hand: ", total_hand(player)    
    print
    print "< ---- Dealer Hand ---->"
    print "Dealer Hand: ", dealer                      
    print "Total Dealer Hand: ", total_hand(dealer)
    print

    if (total_hand(player) == 21):
        print "BLACKJACK! YOU WIN!"
        message()
    if (total_hand(player) > 21):
        print "BUSTED! You Lose"
        message()
    if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
        print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins"               # must use if   statements because elif would fail to reach the tie line.
        message()
    if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
        print "Dealer Busted! You Win!"
        message()
    if (total_hand(player) == 21) and (total_hand(dealer) == 21):    # must use if       statements because elif would fail to reach this line.
        print "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
        message()

    while (c != "q"):   
        c = raw_input("[H]it [S]tand [Q]uit: ").lower()    
        if (c == "h"):
            hit(player)         
            print ""
            print "Your Cards Are Now: ",player                 
            print "Total For Player Is: ",total_hand(player)
            if (total_hand(player) == 21):
            print "BLACKJACK! You Win!"
            message()
            if (total_hand(player) > 21):
                print "BUSTED! Sorry, You Lose."
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins."
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) <= 17): 
                hit(dealer)
                print "\nThe Dealer Takes A Card", dealer
                print "For A Total Of: ", total_hand(dealer)
                if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                    print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins.\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                    message()               
            elif (c == "s"):
            if (total_hand(dealer) <= 17):
                hit(dealer)
                print "The Dealer Takes A Card", dealer
                print "For A Total Of: ", total_hand(dealer)
                if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                    print "BLACKJACK! Dealer Wins.\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) >= total_hand(player)):
                    print "Sorry, You Lose. Dealer Wins With A Tie\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(player) > total_hand(dealer)):
                    print "You Win With The Best Hand!\n"
                    message()
             if (total_hand(player) > total_hand(dealer)):
                print "You Win With The Best Hand!\n"
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) > total_hand(player)):
                print "Sorry, You Lose. Dealer Wins\n"
                message()
        else:
            if (c == "q"):
                message()
            else:
                print "Invalid Choice. . .To Quit, Press [Q]"




def deal_cards():
    random1 = random.randint(1,11)
    random2 = random.randint(1,11)
    hand = [random1, random2]
    return hand


def hit(hand):
    newCard = random.randint(1,11)
    hand.append(newCard)
    return hand


def total_hand(hand):
    total = sum(hand)
    return total


def message():
    again = raw_input("Do You Want To Play Again? [Y] For Yes - Press Any Key To Quit:   ").lower()
    if "y" in again:
        main()
    else:
        print "Thanks For Playing"
        os._exit(1)


# main

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by John3136, Jan Dvorak, Volatility, Blckknght, Bakuriu Mar 3 '13 at 20:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Python's elif is equivalent to else: if. That is, if your earlier condition is reached, it won't even check the next one. If you want some conditions to have precedence over others, you need to list them first! – Blckknght Feb 27 '13 at 6:45
    
Thank you. .I understand what you're saying, I think I even mentioned that in my question. The question I'm getting at, would YOU use multiple if statements as I did, or would you change it to if. .elif's, making sure higher precedence code is listed first? And again, thanks for the help! – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:41
    
I think some of the answers spell this out, but you should use multiple if statements if you want it to be possible for several of them to be triggered at the same time. If only one should ever happen, use if/elif/else. I think you're not seeing the usual behavior in your code because you've written it with a call to message that will never return. That's generally poor coding style (a loop would be better). – Blckknght Feb 27 '13 at 15:54
    
I see what you're saying. And that's exactly the answer I was looking for. .Thanks again. – Chris Kavanagh Feb 28 '13 at 11:54

Try putting the more specific conditions before the less specific conditions.

For example if you change the order from this

if (total_hand(player) == 21):
    print "BLACKJACK! YOU WIN!"
    message()
if (total_hand(player) > 21):
    print "BUSTED! You Lose"
    message()
if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
    print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins"                
    message()
if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!"
    message()
if (total_hand(player) == 21) and (total_hand(dealer) == 21):         
    print "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
    message()

to this

if (total_hand(player) == 21) and (total_hand(dealer) == 21):         
    print "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
    message()
elif (total_hand(player) == 21):
    print "BLACKJACK! YOU WIN!"
    message()
elif (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
    print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins"                
    message()
elif (total_hand(player) > 21):
    print "BUSTED! You Lose"
    message()
elif (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!"
    message()

Before you could not reach all of the conditions for a statement with elifs because the conditions needed to satisfy the last statement would be true for the first or third statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. .Good point. I understand that it can be done your way, However is my way wrong? I guess that's really my question. – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:15

A major issue with your code is that you should check for the tie first, otherwise your declare player the winner.

With your code, it does not actually make a difference whether you use if or elif. That's because the message() function never actually returns: it either exits the program or calls main() recursively. That is not good design: anyone else reading your code would not expect a function named message() to do either of those things.

My suggestion would be to create a function to check if game is over and return a string that describes the result. Here's how I might do it; note however that even here you could just as well use if instead of elif, because the return statements exit the function anyway.

def check_game_over(total_player, total_dealer):
    if total_dealer == 21:
        if total_player == 21:
            return "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
        else:
            return "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins"              
    elif total_player == 21:
        return "BLACKJACK! YOU WIN!"
    elif total_player > 21:
        return "BUSTED! You Lose"
    elif total_dealer > 21:
        return "Dealer Busted! You Win!"
    else:
        return None
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. . .Should I be using 'elif', or was the way I did it ok? I tried it several ways, using 'elif''s first, then I changed it to the current way (the code worked both ways). .My question is, did I do it correctly or not? – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:18
    
EDIT - - -I meant to add I understand your advice about putting the tie first if I use elif's. . .I guess my real question is, although the code works the way I did it, would you have used multiple if statements or would you have used if. .elif's instead? What would a good programmer (like you & others here) have done? – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:35
    
Thank you Janne. I've taken your advice. – Chris Kavanagh Mar 2 '13 at 7:43
    
Question Janne: You say the message() function is not good design. Is this simply because of what I named it ("anyone else reading your code would not expect a function named message() to do either of those things") or for a different reason altogether? Just trying to learn, thanks again. – Chris Kavanagh Mar 9 '13 at 8:20
    
@ChrisKavanagh Another thing is that when one sees a function call, one expects it to return and execution to continue from the next line. Your message() does not return and this makes your program difficult to analyze. – Janne Karila Mar 18 '13 at 14:47

No, there are a couple of small indentation mistakes and at the end, you could have used an elif statement. Here is what your code should look like.

def main():
    print "Welcome To Python Blackjack. [H] Is For A Hit, [S] Is To Stand, [Q] To       Quit.\n"
    c = ""    # Hit, Stand or Quit Variable.
    player = deal_cards()    # deal player
    dealer = deal_cards()    # deal dealer
    print "< ---- Player Hand ---->"
    print "Player Hand: ", player    
    print "Total Player Hand: ", total_hand(player)    
    print
    print "< ---- Dealer Hand ---->"
    print "Dealer Hand: ", dealer                      
    print "Total Dealer Hand: ", total_hand(dealer)
    print

    if (total_hand(player) == 21):
        print "BLACKJACK! YOU WIN!"
        message()
    if (total_hand(player) > 21):
        print "BUSTED! You Lose"
        message()
    if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
        print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins"               # must use if   statements because elif would fail to reach the tie line.
        message()
    if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
        print "Dealer Busted! You Win!"
        message()
    if (total_hand(player) == 21) and (total_hand(dealer) == 21):    # must use if       statements because elif would fail to reach this line.
        print "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
        message()

    while (c != "q"):   
        c = raw_input("[H]it [S]tand [Q]uit: ").lower()    
        if (c == "h"):
            hit(player)         
            print ""
            print "Your Cards Are Now: ",player                 
            print "Total For Player Is: ",total_hand(player)
            if (total_hand(player) == 21):
            print "BLACKJACK! You Win!"
            message()
            if (total_hand(player) > 21):
                print "BUSTED! Sorry, You Lose."
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins."
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) <= 17): 
                hit(dealer)
                print "\nThe Dealer Takes A Card", dealer
                print "For A Total Of: ", total_hand(dealer)
                if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                    print "BLACKJACK! Sorry You Lose! Dealer Wins.\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                    message()               
        elif (c == "s"):
            if (total_hand(dealer) <= 17):
                hit(dealer)
                print "The Dealer Takes A Card", dealer
                print "For A Total Of: ", total_hand(dealer)
                if (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                    print "BLACKJACK! Dealer Wins.\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) > 21):
                    print "Dealer Busted! You Win!\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(dealer) >= total_hand(player)):
                    print "Sorry, You Lose. Dealer Wins With A Tie\n"
                    message()
                if (total_hand(player) > total_hand(dealer)):
                    print "You Win With The Best Hand!\n"
                    message()
             if (total_hand(player) > total_hand(dealer)):
                print "You Win With The Best Hand!\n"
                message()
            if (total_hand(dealer) > total_hand(player)):
                print "Sorry, You Lose. Dealer Wins\n"
                message()
        elif (c == "q"):
            message()
        else:
            print "Invalid Choice. . .To Quit, Press [Q]"
share|improve this answer
    
The second-to-last if clause isn't properly indented in this example. – Stjepan Bakrac Feb 27 '13 at 6:46
    
Yeah, when I pasted the code into my post it got screwed up. Sorry about that. . .Thanks much for the help! – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:29

In this case, using elif is perfectly safe.

Do you want exactly one of several clauses to happen? Always use elif. Is it possible that more than one, not necessarily related clauses can happen? Use if.

Here's an example of why you need to be careful about the difference:

x = 0
if x < 1:
    do_something()
elif x < 2:
    do_something_else_instead()

This kind of nesting is sometimes done to check if x is within different ranges. However, if you don't use elif here:

x = 0
if x < 1:
    do_something()
if x < 2:
    do_something_else_instead()

Now both these clauses will be executed, instead of only one, because if x is smaller than one, it will also be smaller than two. This can sometimes be avoided by checking properly, like this:

x = 0
if x < 1:
    do_something()
if x >= 1 and x < 2:
    do_something_else_instead()

However, if do_something() modifies x as well, it's possible that it increases it and pushes it in the 1 <= x < 2 range, so the second clause will be executed as well. To prevent that issue, simply use elif, that one guarantees, that only one of the clauses is executed, the first one that evaluates to True.

share|improve this answer
    
Aha! I see what you're saying. There are dangers either way. Thank you so much for the help! I'll keep your post in my notes. – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:26

A sequence of if/elif/elif/.../elif/else is just a chain of tests, run one-after-another until one succeeds (or until all of them fail and the else is executed). In contrast, a sequence of ifs is just a sequence of independent tests, each of which is run without consulting the others.

The order of the sequence of tests matters! Earlier tests run before later tests. Therefore, if you do

def rangetest(n):
    if n >= 40:
        print "Big!"
    elif n >= 25:
        print "Medium!"
    elif n >= 10:
        print "Small!"
    else:
        print "Tiny!"

then putting in rangetest(100) will always print only Big!, even though the rest of the conditions all match. (If we used only if here instead of elif, then we would get Big!, Medium! and Small! all printed out).


The other answers speak to the use of if/elif in your program. I'd just like to point out one little thing.

I'd invert the logic of your program. Instead of having main call out to a function message which in turn calls main, I'd write a main loop that looks like this:

def main():
    play_game()
    while 1:
        again = raw_input("Do You Want To Play Again? [Y] For Yes - Press Any Key To Quit:   ")
        if 'y' in again.lower():
            play_game()
        else:
            print "Thanks for playing!"
            return # exit main loop

Then play_game will contain the main logic for the game, with return instead of message(). This simplifies your control flow since you simply quit the current round (by using return) instead of awkwardly "looping" main through message.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome/ Thanks for the help! I'm going to change my code like you and minopret suggest. – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:27
    
Concretely, your logic function is now play_game (or whatever else makes sense), and play_game will use return (returning back up to the main loop) instead of calling message. This new main implements the functionality of message in a much more straightforward way that exposes the main structure of the game (a loop that continues until the user quits). – nneonneo Mar 7 '13 at 19:13
    
I'm a little confused on the context I should use your code. I understand your code, just not how exactly to use it? Should I name the main logic, play_game(),(instead of main()), replace my message function with your main function, and then replace all the places I used my message function (in the main logic for the game) with the 'new' main func (you created)? I don't think this is what you meant,therefore I thought I'd better ask. .Again, THANKS for the help. It's greatly appreciated. – Chris Kavanagh Mar 7 '13 at 19:13
    
Whoops, I saw your old comment, so my reply is above yours. HTH. – nneonneo Mar 7 '13 at 19:17
    
Good Lord, that was quick! You must have been waiting for me to as, lol. . .Thanks again nneonneo. It is appreciated. – Chris Kavanagh Mar 7 '13 at 19:18

If you revise to use a while loop inside of main, instead of calling main from message, I suggest that your program will end up much shorter and clearer.

Structured programming is the once but no longer controversial idea that we use conditional constructs like if and elif plus loops like while in preference to other methods of controlling what happens next. Your calls from message to, alternatively, main and os.exit are taking a different strategy from structured programming. By arranging to call main repeatedly through message, you paint yourself into a corner. In fact os.exit is among only a small number of ways to get out of that corner. Another is to throw an exception and catch it outside of main.

So try sketching it out this way instead:

def main():
    play()

def play():
    again = True
    while again:
        player = deal_cards()
        dealer = deal_cards()
        print ...
        ...
        game_over = False
        while not game_over
            if (total_hand(player) == 21) and (total_hand(dealer) == 21):
                print "Player And Dealer Tie! Game Goes To Dealer"
                game_over = True
                # You don't need to do anything else here.
            elif total_hand(player) == 21:
                print ...
                game_over = True
            elif total_hand(dealer) == 21:
                print ...
                game_over = True
            elif ...
                print ...
            elif ...
                ...
            else ...
                print ...

            if not game_over:
                c = raw_input("[H]it [S]tand [Q]uit: ").lower()
                if c == "q":
                    game_over = True
                elif c == "h":
                    hit(player)
                    # You don't need to do anything else here.
                else:
                    ...

        answer = raw_input("Do You Want To Play Again? [Y] For Yes - Press Any Key To Quit:   ").lower()
        again = ("y" in answer)

(Please ignore this note to experts, only because there are many here at Stack Overflow: I know about fun alternatives to structured programming involving recursion, proper tail calls, and trampolining. For this particular question I suggest that they are not the next step.)

share|improve this answer
    
...? This is seriously a confusing answer. – nneonneo Feb 27 '13 at 7:02
    
@nneonneo Did you read def message() in that program? – minopret Feb 27 '13 at 7:06
    
Lol, thank you for the advice. I'll take a good look at what you said and see if I can improve my code. I was actually looking for advice like this (in addition to the my original question). .This is actually the first script I've written in Python (or any language). . .minopret, tell me in your words what exactly is wrong with the message() function? Lol, I WANT TO LEARN! Thanks for the help. – Chris Kavanagh Feb 27 '13 at 15:22
    
I didn't know that. It's an excellent first program. Sure, I can try to think of what else to say. Your message function isn't wrong. But it's very unusual. What I'm about to tell you, you don't need to know well, but it's kind of cool: there is a style of programming called "continuation-passing style" (CPS) in which every method is like your message method. Every method ends by calling another method and no method ever reaches its end or calls a return statement. Hardly anyone uses or even knows CPS unless they're writing a compiler or teaching computer science. – minopret Feb 27 '13 at 17:19
    
You did say it's your first program? OK then, I hope it's obvious how the variables again and game_over work, but they may seem a little weird. They're called flags. Some people minimize their use of flags. I think flags are OK and it's not worth twisting around to avoid them. I would just make sure to use each flag in a pretty simple way. Otherwise it could get difficult to understand which path the code will follow. – minopret Feb 27 '13 at 17:26

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