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I'm trying to translate one of my Java projects to Python and I'm having trouble with one certain line. The Java code is:

if (++j == 9)
    return true;

What I think this is supposed to be in python is

if (j += 1) ==9:
        return True

...but I am getting an error SyntaxError: invalid syntax.

How can I translate this Java to Python?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, that is indeed a syntax error.

You probably want:

j += 1
if j == 9:
  return True

The reason is because python requires an expression after the if keyword (docs), whereas j += 1 is a statement.


And congratulations, you've just dodged a bullet - by not translating it to:

if (++j == 9):
    return True

which is valid python code, and would almost certainly be a bug!

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2  
Hopefully nobody would use parentheses in an if like that :) –  squiguy Feb 27 '13 at 7:06
    
+1 for the valid Python code example that doesn't do what a new Python programmer might expect (I was caught by that some years back). –  Johnsyweb Feb 27 '13 at 7:35

Just break it up into two lines since Python doesn't have the ++ operator.

j += 1
if j == 9:
  return True

As wim has pointed out, and if statement requires something that evaluates to a True or False value. In Java, the ++j portion will be evaluated before the comparison. Then the new j value will be compared thus resulting in a true or false expression.

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The += operator is an assignment operator. Assignment operators need to be run separately from your conditional statement. You should run the code like this:

j+=1
if j==9:
   return True
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  • There are no ++ (or --) operators in Python.
  • j += 1 doesn't return a value so there is nothing to compare.

It looks like you want:

if j == 8:
    return True

If j is global (usually frowned upon), then:

j += 1
if j == 9:
    return True
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j += 1 is equivalent to j = j + 1. It doesn't actually return a value, but just overwrites the variable j. I'm presuming you want to see if j + 1 == 9, so replace:

if (j += 1) ==9:
    return True

With:

j += 1
if j == 9:
    return True
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The ++ operator does not exist in Python. Instead you could do:

j += 1
if j == 9:
    return True
share|improve this answer
    
The return is not equivalent. –  wim Feb 27 '13 at 6:54
    
This would not execute any code that's (possibly) after the if. –  Stjepan Bakrac Feb 27 '13 at 6:55
    
Correct, I've changed it accordingly. –  Bálint Aradi Feb 27 '13 at 6:55

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