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class baseClass
{
    derivedClass nm = new derivedClass();
}

class derivedClass : baseClass
{
}

This code builds fine. What might be the possible reason for C# to allow creating derivedClass objects in baseClass. Can you think of any specific reasons for doing this?

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Why do you think C# should restrict that ? –  yogi Feb 27 '13 at 7:14
    
Do you know any Object-Oriented language that restricts that? There is nothing special about it. –  MD.Unicorn Feb 27 '13 at 7:16
    
I am not able to think of a reason for creating derivedClass instance in baseClass. So I am wondering why C# allows it? –  Deepak Raj Feb 27 '13 at 7:16
    
@MD.Unicorn: nope.. i do not know any language restricting this. But why don't they restrict if it will not be useful? If for some reason we can use this, please tell me the reason. –  Deepak Raj Feb 27 '13 at 7:19
    
Not being able to think of a usage is not a good reason to prohibit something. The number of times I find classes which are sealed because the original dev couldn't think of a case that you would inherit it... –  Aron Feb 27 '13 at 7:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This code builds fine.

Yes - why do you think it wouldn't?

What might be the possible reason for C# to allow creating derivedClass objects in baseClass.

Because there's no reason to prohibit it?

Can you think of any specific reasons for doing this?

Static factory methods, for example?

// BaseClass gets to decide which concrete class to return
public static BaseClass GetInstance()
{
    return new DerivedClass();
}

That's actually a pretty common pattern. We use it a lot in Noda Time for example, where CalendarSystem is a public abstract class, but all the concrete derived classes are internal.

Sure, it's crazy to have the exact example you've given - with an instance field initializing itself by creating an instance of a derived class - because it would blow up the stack due to recursion - but that's not a matter of it being a derived class. You'd get the same thing by initializing the same class:

class Bang
{
    // Recursively call constructor until the stack overflows.
    Bang bang = new Bang();
}
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:its not factory method if its static, you may want to write static factory or Creation Method. –  Saurabh Feb 27 '13 at 7:18
    
@Saurabh: Changed to "static factory method" but I'm not sure there's much benefit in the distinction here, to be honest. –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 7:23
    
:i have read somewhere about the difference which is as follows Creation Method: A static or non static method that creates (or clones) an instance of a class. Factory Method : A method defined and implemented in a hierarchy to supply polymorphic creation of some class type. –  Saurabh Feb 27 '13 at 7:26
    
@Saurabh: Well the Wikipedia page on factory methods includes similar examples, which they call "static factory methods". They point out that it doesn't comply with the Factory Method Pattern as there's no polymorphism, but the meaning is pretty clear IMO. (Btw, why are you prefixing your comments with ":"?) –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 8:01
    
@user1416420: In what way does "Sure, it's crazy to have the exact example you've given because it would blow up the stack due to recursion" not clearly state that the stack will blow? –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 8:02

A developer I used to work with produced this code in our codebase. I personally agree its useful.

public class Foo
{
    public static Foo MagicalFooValue
    {
        get { return Bar.Instance; }
    }

    private class Bar : Foo
    {
        //Implemented as a private singleton
    }
}
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One obvious case is to have a factory method in the base class returning appropriate implementations based on some condition.

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derivedClass can be instantiated in baseClass because it is an accessible class. There is no reason why c# should restrict you from doing so. Likewise, you can create an instance of baseClass within baseClass itself.

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