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I am trying to get the symbols of the currencies based on their Locale. But instead of returning a symbol, it is returning the code. I have a snippet:

import java.util.Currency;
import java.util.Locale;

public class CurrencyFormat
{
  public void displayCurrencySymbols() 
  {
   Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(Locale.US); 
   System.out.println("United States: " + currency.getSymbol());
  } 
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    new CurrencyFormat().displayCurrencySymbols();
  }
}

For Locale.US it is giving symbol $ but If I replace

Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(Locale.US); 

with

Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(Locale.GERMANY); 

Then instead of symbol it is giving the country code. Why is this and how we can get the symbols?

EDIT : After looking some answer I would like to clear that setting some specific default local is not a solution as I need all the avalaible sign displayed at once.

e.g.

 Locale.setDefault(Locale.UK); 

will give me the euro sign but for doller it will give the code instead of doller sign($).

share|improve this question
    
I get USD rather than a $, using the latest Java 7 on Windows 7. My default locale is British, however. For Germany I see a Euro sign and for UK I see a pound sign. –  Duncan Feb 27 '13 at 7:39
    
What version of Java are you using? –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 7:42
    
If I set Locale.setDefault(Locale.US);, I get the same results as you. –  Duncan Feb 27 '13 at 7:42
    
Same with me, I get USD for locale US and for GERMANY. I'm sitting at a Mac with german settings. (And for UK, I get GBP. Code executed on eclipse Juno SR1) –  Andreas_D Feb 27 '13 at 7:42
2  
What are you trying to achieve, precisely? Perhaps you just want to pass the same locale into getSymbol, to get "the representation that someone of that locale would use for their own currency"? –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 7:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

hi please try the following code

import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Currency;
import java.util.Locale;
import java.util.SortedMap;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class CurrencyExample
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
         Utils.getCurrencySymbol( Currency.getInstance(Locale.US).getCurrencyCode());
         Utils.getCurrencySymbol(Currency.getInstance(Locale.JAPAN).getCurrencyCode());
         Utils.getCurrencySymbol(Currency.getInstance(Locale.UK).getCurrencyCode());
         Utils.getCurrencySymbol("INR");
    }
}

class Utils{
      public static SortedMap<Currency, Locale> currencyLocaleMap;
      static {
          currencyLocaleMap = new TreeMap<Currency, Locale>(new Comparator<Currency>() {
            public int compare(Currency c1, Currency c2){
                return c1.getCurrencyCode().compareTo(c2.getCurrencyCode());
            }
        });
        for (Locale locale : Locale.getAvailableLocales()) {
             try {
                 Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(locale);
             currencyLocaleMap.put(currency, locale);
             }catch (Exception e){
         }
        }
    }

    public static String getCurrencySymbol(String currencyCode) {
        Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(currencyCode);
        System.out.println( currencyCode+ ":-" + currency.getSymbol(currencyLocaleMap.get(currency)));
        return currency.getSymbol(currencyLocaleMap.get(currency));
    }
}

The output of above program is like that:

USD:-$
JPY:-¥
GBP:-£
INR:-Rs.
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Amrit, this is exactly what I was looking for. –  Ram Dutt Shukla Mar 12 '13 at 5:12

You are seeing what Java thinks users in your default locale expect to see for a currency symbol. This is also confirmed by the Javadocs for getSymbol():

Gets the symbol of this currency for the default locale. For example, for the US Dollar, the symbol is "$" if the default locale is the US, while for other locales it may be "US$". If no symbol can be determined, the ISO 4217 currency code is returned.

By changing your default locale:

Locale.setDefault(Locale.UK); // e.g.

You can experiment to prove this for yourself. (Note: I'm not suggesting this is a solution, merely an opportunity for you to check what other locales see).

I would recommend you stick with whatever Java thinks is appropriate for your default locale - I'm sure it's understandable by your users.


It might seem attractive to seek the "normal" currency symbol for every currency, however take a look at the following currency list: http://www.xe.com/symbols.php.

Look how many countries recognise their currency with a $ symbol. Egypt also uses the British pound symbol (£). The whole idea behind the locale currency symbol is to give you a string that users in your locale will understand.

share|improve this answer
    
setting Default local to UK is giving me the EURO sign but now I am not getting the $ sign. –  Ram Dutt Shukla Feb 27 '13 at 7:50
    
The default locale may very well not be the locale of the user though - think webapp... –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '13 at 7:50
1  
@JonSkeet But that's always going to be a challenge for webapps. Even down to what the time should be considered to be. I would have thought most webapps were either fixed to a locale (in a "deal with it, user" sense) or would allow the user to select a locale, timezone, etc. –  Duncan Feb 27 '13 at 7:52
    
Anyway, that seems to be wrong approach to get the $ sign for the US currency on all machines. But good to know/to remember. If we rely on the wrong assumption that we get the $ that way, software may fail on other machines. –  Andreas_D Feb 27 '13 at 7:53
    
@Andreas_D For many countries, $ means something else anyway. In Australia, for example, or Hong Kong. –  Duncan Feb 27 '13 at 7:54

A simpler solution, based on Amrit Raj Sharma's answer:

Just add the locale as a parameter to the getSymbol() method.

So, change your code to:

import java.util.Currency;
import java.util.Locale;

public class CurrencyFormat
{
  public void displayCurrencySymbols() 
  {
   Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(Locale.US); 
   System.out.println("United States: " + currency.getSymbol(Locale.US));
  } 
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    new CurrencyFormat().displayCurrencySymbols();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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