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I have two different static sites with different designs! I want to run them under 1 Jekyll server.. how to do it?

To be specific: here is my situation:

My github repo has a gh-pages branch. Now, my project needs two different sites (of course running under same root with sub folders).

  1. documentation site - should run at
  2. Testing site - should run at

each of these two sites have their own _includes, _layouts, static files etc.. those two are completely different..

How do I setup such a project..

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1 Answer 1

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This is simple if you are willing to build the sites locally by running Jekyll first, and then pushing the contents of _site to the respective directories on the gh-pages branch of your repo.

In the github repo called "repo", just create a gh-pages branch with the directories doc and test. Copy the contents of _site generated by running Jekyll on each of your separate Jekyll projects (which can live wherever you want) to doc/ and test/ and voila.

I do not believe you can trick github into running jekyll twice on the same repo to compile the different sites as sub-folders. However, simply by using different layouts in _layouts (pointing to different css files, etc) you can make two completely separate webpages appear as you want them to be -- I don't see why it is strictly necessary (other than simple preference) to maintain them as separate Jekyll projects. (This approach would allow you to just push your changes and let github run Jekyll and build the site).

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actually, I am working on a HTML project. So, we are thinking create a preview site along with documentation page!! that's why we need two different layouts.. I guess, pushing _site files is the only idea.. –  Surya Feb 28 '13 at 13:10

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