Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table with a column bit(1) and the following query: SELECT my_bit FROM my_table.

When I echo the result on a php page the value shows up as string(3) %qu whether the bit value on a column is 0 or 1. How is this possible?

The following query resolved the issue when echoing on a web page: SELECT CAST(my_bit AS UNSIGNED) AS my_bit FROM my_table.

However, both of the queries above work on a command line tool. No string(3)s there.

Also everything works when selecting data, no difference between

  1. SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE my_bit=0
  2. SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE my_bit=(0)

when using command line tool or web interface php pages. (The latter is suggested here.) Echoing has to be done using CAST function but the WHERE is not affected by the parentehis: correct rows are returned.

Main questions

  1. How come the returned bit type value is echoed as identical string whether the bit value is 0 or 1?
  2. Are there any special issues that should be taken into consideration when inserting/selecting data using bit(1) type column? (Quick testing shows that everything works as intended: 0 get inserted as 0 and 1 as 1, but I might be missing something.)

I'm testing this locally with MAMP: PHP 5.3.2 and MySQL 5.1.44. Command line tool refers to Sequel Pro (not MAMP's PhpAdmin). Php pages are utf-8 and queries use SET NAMES 'utf8'.


Update: code

CREATE TABLE `my_table` (
  `id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `my_bit` bit(1) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`,`lto_muu`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_swedish_ci;

INSERT INTO `my_table` (`id`, `my_bit`) VALUES (null, 0), (null,1)

//php page
//query option 1
SELECT `id`, `my_bit`  FROM `my_table`
//query option 2
SELECT `id`, CAST(`my_bit` AS UNSIGNED) AS `my_bit`  FROM `my_table`

$mysqli = new mysqli("localhost", "root", "root","my_db");
$q = "SELECT `id`, `my_bit`  FROM `my_table`";//returns 2 rows

$r = $mysqli->query($q);

while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($r,MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
echo 'id: ' . $row['id'] . ' - bit: ' . $row['my_bit'] . '<br />';
}

Query option 1 prints out:

id: 1 - bit: %qu
id: 2 - bit: %qu

Query option 2 prints out:

id: 1 - bit: 0
id: 2 - bit: 1

Update 2: Álvaro's code

$conn = new mysqli('localhost', 'root', 'root','test');
//$mysqli->set_charset('utf8');
$conn->query('DROP TABLE IF EXISTS bit_test');
$conn->query('CREATE TABLE bit_test (
    my_bit BIT(1) NULL,
    my_multiple_bit BIT(8) NULL
)');
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'0', b'111')");
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'1', b'10000000')");

//opt 1
$q = 'SELECT cast(my_bit as unsigned) as my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';
//opt2 
//$q = 'SELECT my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';
$r = $conn->query($q);
while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($r, MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
    echo bin2hex($row['my_bit']) . '<br />';
    echo bin2hex($row['my_multiple_bit']) . '<br />';
    var_dump($row);
    echo '<br /><br />';
}

Using PHP 5.2.12 opt 1 and 2 both print:

30
07
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(1) ""
}
31
80
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(1) "�"
}

Using PHP 5.3.2 opt 1 prints:

30
257175
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
}
31
257175
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
}

And opt 2:

257175
257175
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
}
257175
257175
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(3) "%qu"
}

PHP 5.3.2 alvays prints %qu. Does this make any sense?

share|improve this question
    
I cannot reproduce it. I always get either the raw binary bits or the decimal representation of the binary number, depending on how I test. I don't think this question can be solved without seeing your code. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 27 '13 at 8:57
    
I'm afraid I still cannot reproduce it. I get id: 1 - bit: 0<br />id: 2 - bit: 1<br /> with both queries. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 27 '13 at 11:36
    
@alvaro I have MAMP with PHP 5.3.2. I tried the other alternative available in MAMP: PHP 5.2.13. That prints out nothing with query option 2 althought var_dump() shows ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "". Why is empty string 1 in length. The issue seems to solely related to PHP version. Or are there other explanations? –  ZZ-bb Feb 27 '13 at 11:51
    
string(1) means there's one byte. It doesn't need to be a printable char. If you don't have an hexadecimal editor you can use bin2hex() to inspect it. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 27 '13 at 11:53
    
Is your code using bind variables? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Feb 27 '13 at 11:57
show 3 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a full example on how to retrieve BIT column types:

<?php

$conn = new PDO('mysql:host=test;dbname=test', 'test', 'test');
$conn->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

$conn->query('DROP TABLE IF EXISTS bit_test');
$conn->query('CREATE TABLE bit_test (
    my_bit BIT(1) NULL,
    my_multiple_bit BIT(8) NULL
)');
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'0', b'111')");
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'1', b'10000000')");

$res = $conn->query('SELECT my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM test');
while($row = $res->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC)){
    var_dump($row);
}

... which prints:

array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(1) "7"
}
array(2) {
  ["my_bit"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["my_multiple_bit"]=>
  string(3) "128"
}

Edit #1:

Here's my previous code, adapted to mysqli:

<?php

$conn = new mysqli('localhost', 'test', 'test','test');

$conn->query('DROP TABLE IF EXISTS bit_test');
$conn->query('CREATE TABLE bit_test (
    my_bit BIT(1) NULL,
    my_multiple_bit BIT(8) NULL
)');
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'0', b'111')");
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'1', b'10000000')");

$res = $conn->query('SELECT my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM test');
#while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($res, MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
while($row = $res->fetch_array(MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
    var_dump($row);
}

I get an additional array item with all values set to NULL (I'm not familiar with mysqli so it's probably my fault) but output is otherwise identical. I've tested it in PHP/5.3.0 and PHP/5.4.5.

I suggest you try my code verbatim and verify whether you still get %qu or something weird. I have a strong feeling that such %qu string might be leaking from somewhere else...

Edit #2:

From the additional information, I think we can conclude the following:

  • Earlier PHP versions retrieved BIT columns as-is, as raw binary strings (0x07 and 0x80 are the correct numbers, 7 and 128 in decimal).

  • At some point, automatic encoding was added and BIT columns started being retrieved as decimals.

  • The PHP release used by the OP probably has a bug in the encoding code: %qu reminds of me C printf modifiers (though I couldn't find its exact definition).

Given the different behaviours, a workaround is required to ensure coherent output:

  • CAST(my_bit AS UNSIGNED) to generate a decimal number
  • HEX(my_bit) to generate an hexadecimal number
share|improve this answer
    
Added code, sorry it took a while. I use an ajax call on my page and singleton class to connect to the DB but the example code recreates the issue. Please let me know if any additional information is necessary and if you are not able to recreate the issue with the example code. –  ZZ-bb Feb 27 '13 at 11:33
    
+1 yesterday for your help. I dug a little deeper and added an answer of my own. If no one offers better explanation or prove either of us wrong I'll accept your anwer or mine in a few days. Your hexadecimal/decimal views helped a lot. Thank you for your help. –  ZZ-bb Feb 28 '13 at 10:44
1  
Accepted this answer since it helped me to understand the original issue. This answer has also a working solution. Be sure to check my answer also for additional working solution. –  ZZ-bb Mar 6 '13 at 12:01
add comment

Short answer

OK, here's are short and long answers to my own question. If you want to be sure that bit(1) column gets retrieved as an integer use the following query when retrieving bit(1) values:

$q = 'SELECT (my_bit + 0) AS my_bit, (my_multiple_bit + 0) AS my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';

If "+ 0" is not used the value of a bit(1) column is treated as binary string. This is the moment when I say "RTFM" to myself...

Something similar is found here through the magic of Google...

If you are happy with quick solution, stop reading now.

Now the messy/long answer (let's use Álvaro's code)

Let's create the table and use four different queries with two PHP versions available on my MAMP installation: 5.3.2 & 5.2.12.

$conn = new mysqli('localhost', 'root', 'root','my_db');

$conn->query('DROP TABLE IF EXISTS bit_test');
$conn->query('CREATE TABLE bit_test (
    my_bit BIT(1) NULL,
    my_multiple_bit BIT(8) NULL
)');

$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'0', b'111')");
$conn->query("INSERT INTO bit_test (my_bit, my_multiple_bit) VALUES (b'1', b'10000000')");

//q1
$q = 'SELECT (my_bit + 0) AS my_bit, (my_multiple_bit + 0) AS my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';
//q2
//$q = 'SELECT cast(my_bit as unsigned) as my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';
//q3
//$q = 'SELECT HEX(my_bit) AS my_bit , HEX(my_multiple_bit) AS my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';
//q4
//$q = 'SELECT my_bit, my_multiple_bit FROM bit_test';

$r = $conn->query($q);

//let's echo a few options
//plain gives unaltered result
//bin2hex gives hexadecimal number of an ASCII string (since) the values are treated as strings
//base16to10 gives decimal representation of hexadecimal value
//yes, the two functions are contradictionary (dependable of the query in use)
//but I'll echo their result anyway
while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($r, MYSQLI_ASSOC)){
  echo 'plain: ' . $row['my_bit'] . '<br />';
  echo 'plain: ' . $row['my_multiple_bit'] . '<br />';
  echo 'bin2hex: ' . bin2hex($row['my_bit']) . '<br />';
  echo 'bin2hex: ' . bin2hex($row['my_multiple_bit']) . '<br />';
  echo 'base16to10: ' . base_convert($row['my_bit'],16,10) . '<br />';
  echo 'base16to10: ' . base_convert($row['my_multiple_bit'],16,10) . '<br />';
  var_dump($row);
  echo '<br /><br />';
}

Here are the results of different queries

What I'm really interested in is the plain output and var_dump, but you can also check the bin2hex and base16to10 output can be useful when looking up if the numbers have some link to their corresponding values: numbers 0, 7, 1 and 128 (the values stored into four bitcolumns of the table).

q1 – the safe bet – output is identical in PHP 5.3.2 & 5.2.12

plain: 0
plain: 7
bin2hex: 30
bin2hex: 37
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 7
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "0" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "7" }

plain: 1
plain: 128
bin2hex: 31
bin2hex: 313238
base16to10: 1
base16to10: 296
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "1" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(3) "128" }

q2 – some differences in output

Works fine with bit(1) but something is quite wrong in my_multiple_bit output.

PHP 5.2.12:
plain: 0
plain: 
bin2hex: 30
bin2hex: 07
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "0" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "" }

plain: 1
plain: �
bin2hex: 31
bin2hex: 80
base16to10: 1
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "1" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "�" } 
PHP 5.3.2
plain: 0
plain: %qu
bin2hex: 30
bin2hex: 257175
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "0" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" }

plain: 1
plain: %qu
bin2hex: 31
bin2hex: 257175
base16to10: 1
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "1" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" }

q3 – output is identical in PHP 5.3.2 & 5.2.12

This is also a safe query to use. Just remember to convert retrieved hexadecimal to decimal number.

plain: 0
plain: 7
bin2hex: 30
bin2hex: 37
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 7
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "0" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "7" }

plain: 1
plain: 80
bin2hex: 31
bin2hex: 3830
base16to10: 1
base16to10: 128
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "1" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(2) "80" }

q4 – output is quite strange

PHP 5.2.12 works fine with bit(1) but I wouldn't use this query if there's any doubt about PHP version in use or it's behaviour.

PHP 5.2.12
plain:
plain: 
bin2hex: 00
bin2hex: 07
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "" }

plain: 
plain: �
bin2hex: 01
bin2hex: 80
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(1) "" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(1) "�" } 
PHP 5.3.2
plain: %qu
plain: %qu
bin2hex: 257175
bin2hex: 257175
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" }

plain: %qu
plain: %qu
bin2hex: 257175
bin2hex: 257175
base16to10: 0
base16to10: 0
array(2) { ["my_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" ["my_multiple_bit"]=> string(3) "%qu" } 

Final thoughts and note to self

RTFM, test and test again.

Also it would be nice to know for sure if this %qu output is an exclusive PHP 5.3.2 bug. (Or what other PHP versions are affected.)

So, Álvaro's answer is correct in sense that use CAST or retrieve HEX values from DB. The manual revealed additional "+0" method which seems take the pain away from different PHP versions behaviour. Hence the short answer is way on the top...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.