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Teaching myself Java. I have reached the recursion stage. How does this code work?

void myMethod( int counter)
{
if(counter == 0)
 return;
else
   {
   System.out.println(""+counter);
   myMethod(--counter);
   return;
   }
} 
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3  
Have you checked similar questions? There are some good step-by-step explanations of recursion examples: link 1, link 2 –  default locale Feb 27 '13 at 8:26
    
if u give the counter value as 4 suppose, then it'll print 4 3 2 1 thats it. –  Ars Feb 27 '13 at 8:27
    
This is an example for the textbook Actually, have you tried to run it? I think it's much easier to understand when you see it running. –  default locale Feb 27 '13 at 8:34
    
As an aside, recursion can lead to stack overflow as each call won't complete until the last call has completed, see stackoverflow.com/questions/3021/… –  Romski Feb 27 '13 at 8:50
    
I like the directory recursion example a lot: stackoverflow.com/questions/2056221/… –  Christian 'fuzi' Orgler Apr 9 '13 at 22:32
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marked as duplicate by Richard Sitze, Siddharth, Mr. Alien, Soner Gönül, Eric Brown Jul 23 '13 at 6:14

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6 Answers

Basically what recursion is, is that a function calls it self in your case with a parameter (the counter).

Each time the function is called, it will check if it's 0 yet, else just print it to your console and the function will call itself again sending the same counter along with a decreased value of 1, ie (counter-1).

Say for example you start your counter at 10.

int counter = 10;
myMethod(counter);

Then myMethod will call it self 10 times, until the counter is 0. And print the value every time it's called.

the output will be

10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
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A recursive function is one that calls itself. The one you included in your question will check if a number is equal to 0, and if not, decrement it by one and call itself again, thus checking if the number is equal to 0 and so on.

There is also tail recursion, which is the case of a recursive function where the last statement is the recursive call, when optimized, tail recursion is VERY FAST because it reuses the stack instead of allocating a new stack frame each time the function is called. Java however currently does not feature tail call optimizations.

Recursive functions can potentially lead to depleting stack space and crashing your application... something, that is called stack overflow (pun intended), so keep in mind this is a possibility.

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I don't think the JVM support tail call optimisation yet (if ever). See here bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4726340 for a more in-depth discussion. –  Erik Feb 27 '13 at 8:42
    
@Erik - yes you are right. Editing my post. –  ddriver Feb 27 '13 at 8:46
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A recursive function is a function which calls itself and will only stop calling itself if it meets a certain condition.

Consider the code you gave, the condition for the recursive function to stop calling itself is to have a 0 counter.

So for example the input is 5:

1) Counter is set to 5. Is counter = 0? No. Then print counter. Decrement counter by 1. Counter is now equals to 4. Call myMethod again.

Current output:
5

2) Counter is set to 4. Is counter = 0? No. Then print counter. Decrement counter by 1. Counter is now equals to 3. Call myMethod again.

Current output:
5
4

3) Counter is set to 3. Is counter = 0? No. Then print counter. Decrement counter by 1. Counter is now equals to 2. Call myMethod again.

Current output:
5
4
3

4) Counter is set to 2. Is counter = 0? No. Then print counter. Decrement counter by 1. Counter is now equals to 1. Call myMethod again.

Current output:
5
4
3
2

5) Counter is set to 1. Is counter = 0? No. Then print counter. Decrement counter by 1. Counter is now equals to 0. Call myMethod again.

Current output:
5
4
3
2
1

6) Counter is set to 0. Is counter = 0? Yes. Exit myMethod.

Final output:
5
4
3
2
1
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Basically we are decrementing counter and calling function recursively. To understand code, you should try to see what will happen if counter is 2. It will go to else because if condition is not satisfied. Then 2 will be printed, and function will be called for 1 and then 1 will be printed. Other thing you need to learn in recursive functions is that it usually contains base condition; condition which will decide when to come out of recursion.

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A popular example when dealing with recursion is the calculation of a factorial. We can use recursion effectively because of the observed pattern that:

6! = 6 x 5!

5! = 5 x 4! etc....

n! = n x (n - 1)!

If we create a method to calculate the factorial we can see that pattern in practice.

private static int recursiveFactorial( final int num )
{
    if ( num == 1 ) //This is our termination condition, 1! = 1
    {
        return 1;
    }

    else //else we put our n x (n-1)! rule into practice.
    {
        return num * recursiveFactorial( num - 1 );
    }
}
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If you didn't run this method you should do it. For better understanding you can output the message on each method call. Here is an example you can run:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
       Main main = new Main();
       main.myMethod(5);
    }

    void myMethod( int counter) {
       System.out.println("Method called with argument: "+counter);
       if(counter == 0) return;
       else {
          System.out.println(""+counter);
          myMethod(--counter);
          return;
       }
} 

}

It gives output:

Method called with argument: 5 
5 
Method called with argument: 4 
4 
Method called with argument: 3 
3 
Method called with argument: 2 
2 
Method called with argument: 1 
1 
Method called with argument: 0 

You can run it on ideone

Here is a flowchart for this method: enter image description here

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