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I want to make a new list of tuples from tuples of list1 if elements in list1 are present or common in list2.

list1 = [('We', 'all'), ('all', 'live'), ('live', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
         ('a', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine.')]

list2 = [('A', 'live'), ('live', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine'),
         ('submarine', 'lifeform'), ('lifeform', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
         ('a', 'sea.')]

expected output = [('live', 'in'), ('in', 'a'), ('a', 'yellow')]

my code is below: It works in this case, but somehow fails in large datasets.

All_elements_set1 = set([item for tuple in list1 for item in tuple])

All_elements_set2 = set([item for tuple in list2 for item in tuple])


common_set = All_elements_set1 & All_elements_set2

new_list = [(i,v) for i,v in list1 if i (in common_set and v in common_set)]

print new_list
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2  
Also explain, what does "somehow fails in large datasets" mean? Can you give an example? –  Joel Cornett Feb 27 '13 at 8:48

2 Answers 2

Basically, you don't need to make a set for elements in list1. All you need if check, for each tuple in list1, whether their elements are in some tuple in list 2...

list1 = [('We', 'all'), ('all', 'live'), ('live', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
         ('a', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine.')]

list2 = [('A', 'live'), ('live', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine'),
         ('submarine', 'lifeform'), ('lifeform', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
         ('a', 'sea.')]

Elements_set2 = set([item for tuple in list2 for item in tuple])

print [(i,v) for i,v in list1 if (i in Elements_set2 and v in Elements_set2 )]

As you are not giving details about the case where your code fails, cannot check whether this one works on your failing example.

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In [39]: from itertools import chain

In [40]: list1 = [('We', 'all'), ('all', 'live'), ('live', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
    ...:          ('a', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine.')]
    ...: 
    ...: list2 = [('A', 'live'), ('live', 'yellow'), ('yellow', 'submarine'),
    ...:          ('submarine', 'lifeform'), ('lifeform', 'in'), ('in', 'a'),
    ...:          ('a', 'sea.')]
    ...: 

In [41]: elems = set(chain.from_iterable(list2))

In [42]: [tup for tup in list1 if elems.issuperset(tup)]
Out[42]: [('live', 'in'), ('in', 'a'), ('a', 'yellow')]
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2  
+1 nice one.. was difficult to understand from the question what OP wants –  avasal Feb 27 '13 at 8:53
1  
all(e in elems for e in t) can be replaced by elems.issuperset(t) - it's a lot more efficient (just timed them), and it's more obvious what it does –  Volatility Feb 27 '13 at 9:00
    
@Volatility -- Thanks, thats a nice improvement. –  root Feb 27 '13 at 9:06

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