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this might be a stupid question and as i don't find the answer on the web i guess it's because the answer is no.

i have a class :

class A{
    public:
        A();
    private:
        std::string a("a");
};

I would like to set the a argument to "a" without calling the class constructor. The reason is that i my real class I have a lot of different constructors and a lot of arguments that will always have the same (constant) value. And if one day i decide to replace "a" by "b" i don't want to modify all the constructors. Moreover, i want that a exists only in my class.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C++11 you have the option of initializing non static member variables at the point of declaration:

class A{
 public:
  A();
private:
  std::string a = "a"; // curly braces allowed too: std::string a{"a"};
};

C++11 also adds delegating constructors, so you can call a class' constructor from other constructors. This allows you to initialize a in only one place:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Foo
{
  Foo() : a("Hello, Foo!") {}
  Foo(int) : Foo() {}
  Foo(int, int) : Foo() {}
  std::string a;
};

int main()
{
  Foo f1(42);
  Foo f2 (1,2);
  std::cout << f1.a << "\n";
  std::cout << f2.a << "\n";
}

Otherwise, use the constructor initialization list as suggested in the other answer:

class A{
 public:
  A() : a("a") {}
 private:
  std::string a;
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, ok, so i need to use the = symbol and not the ()... – PinkFloyd Feb 27 '13 at 8:49
    
as i said I don't want to use the initialization list... – PinkFloyd Feb 27 '13 at 8:50
    
@user2110463 or the {} syntax. () is not allowed because it could be parsed as a function. C++11 also gives you delegating constructors which would allow you to set a in only one place. I will add an example. – juanchopanza Feb 27 '13 at 9:02

You initialize it in the class constructors initializer list:

A::A()
    : a("a")
{
}
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