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I have a studying project which represents simple 3D scene. I'm modifying Model-view matrix to move point of view to some non-origin point using gluLookAt() then I'm placing wire sphere in the origin. And finally I'm modifying projection matrix to receive orthogonal projection with some parameters using glOrtho(). But when window is resized the sphere becomes distorted. I suppose I should modify reshape() and glOrtho() functions, but how?

void display(void){
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
    glColor3b(197, 96, 63);
    glLoadIdentity();    
    gluLookAt(2, 0.5 ,2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0);
    glutWireSphere(0.2, 20, 10);  
    glFlush();
}

void reshape(int w, int h){
    glViewport(0, 0, (GLsizei) w, (GLsizei) h);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho(-1, 1, -1, 1, 0.8 , 100);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
}
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How would like your contents to scale? Letterboxed? Zoomed into the window? – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 27 '13 at 9:05
    
You need to change your glOrtho command to respect the AspectRatio of your screen. Currently, you're telling it to make a perfect square. If you resize your window but don't change the (-1, 1, -1, 1, ...) part of the function call, glOrtho will set up your coordinate system to have things project onto the screen in a perfect square, even when the viewport (w and h) does not represent a square. – user1357649 Feb 27 '13 at 9:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As I said in the comment, you need to set up your Orthographic Projection to fit your window. Assuming your OpenGL Window started off as a square before you resized it, the (-1, 1, -1, 1, ...) was assuming a square coordinate system. If you change it to better reflect the aspect ratio of your Window, you should get a better look. Try the following:

glOrtho ((float)w/(float)h, (float)-w/(float)h, -1, 1, 0.8, 100);

This should keep your coordinate system as you've set it up but respect the aspect ratio (by width).

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Yeah, it works! Great advice, thank you. – vard Feb 27 '13 at 9:16
1  
@vard, Keep in mind this is for when the aspect ratio of the window is skewed towards the width being greater than the height. In other cases, you'd need to move that (float) stuff over to the other 2 parameters and do (float)h/(float)w to keep the aspect ratio consistent with the height being greater than the width. – user1357649 Feb 27 '13 at 9:20

First, and completely unrelated to your problem: Move everything you have right now in reshape to display. Yes, I know many tutorials have it the way you did it, but believe me, it makes things so much clearer when doing it not this way.


Now regarding your question: Ortho sets up the volume in view space, that'e being mapped to the viewport coordinates. The (bottom,left) corner of glOrtho gets mapped to (x,y) of glViewport and (top,right) gets mapped to (x,y)+(width,height) of glViewport.

So you must adjust the glOrtho parameters to the aspect ratio of the viewport. Easy enough:

void display(void)
{
    int const win_width  = glutGet(GLUT_WINDOW_WIDTH);
    int const win_height = glutGet(GLUT_WINDOW_HEIGHT);
    float const win_aspect = (float)win_width / (float)win_height;

    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
    glViewport(0, 0, win_width, win_height);

    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity();
    glOrtho(-win_aspect, win_aspect, -1, 1, 0.8 , 100);

    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity();    
    gluLookAt(2, 0.5 ,2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0);

    glColor3b(197, 96, 63);
    glutWireSphere(0.2, 20, 10);  
    glFlush();
}
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datenwold, thanks for your advice. Do you want to say that display function calling frequency is enough to not sight the changes happened on window reshape, so we can move all the reshape function job to display function? – vard Feb 27 '13 at 9:34
1  
@vard: The display function will always be called after a window resize, since a window resize damages the window's contents, requiring a display refresh. The main use for a dedicated reshape handler is to deal with thing that should happen only when a window resize happens, like reinitializing postprocessing intermediare buffers or such. Setting the projection matrix however is something that happens multiple times throughout rendering a frame (think HUD, minimap, top-front-right views or such) in any serious application, so that code ends up in display anyway. – datenwolf Feb 27 '13 at 13:39

At the moment you project your window to an quadric output with glOrtho(-1, 1, -1, 1, 0.8 , 100);, because the width and the height ist equal. You should change the first four parameters to the current aspect ratio of the window, to prevent distortion. Like

glOrtho(-w/2f, w/2f, -h/2f, h/2f, 0.8 , 100);

(In my example you have to make your sphere bigger, because the projection plane would be greater then yours.)

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Hm, I'see nothing on my screen using your code(( maybe in this projection my sphere is too small? – vard Feb 27 '13 at 9:15
    
Yes, as I wrote you should resize your sphere to be at least w or h times bigger, to have the same output as before. – Gnietschow Feb 27 '13 at 9:31

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