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I have a Play Scala app which has two remotes, one for source, and another for deployment. Deployment needs the ./target directory but I want to keep the source remote clean of build files. Is it possible to have only the source remote ignore the target directory?

thanks!

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I don't know about the Play framework but is it a good idea at all to use a versioning tool to distribute your build artifacts? – Edward Samson Feb 27 '13 at 9:25
    
Quite a few cloud PaaS offerings (heroku, openshift, etc) use pushes to a git remote for deployment. – kreek Feb 27 '13 at 9:47
    
But I do agree I don't like having build artifacts in the repo which is why I want them only tracked for deployment :) – kreek Feb 27 '13 at 9:51
    
From where I stand, we also "use pushes to a git remote for deployment". But we don't push the build artifacts through git, we push just the source, as usual, and our build/deploy server picks that up from git, produces the build artifact, and deploys as appropriate. I'm just saying, maybe you should look past git for a better solution. How do other Play Scala apps usually do it? – Edward Samson Mar 1 '13 at 1:44
    
You can make a war and deploy that to a container, OpenShift does support JBoss and Tomcat so I could deploy that way. I was following this example github.com/opensas/play2-openshift-quickstart. On heroku pushing through git is the only way devcenter.heroku.com/articles/… – kreek Mar 1 '13 at 14:23
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Add a .gitignore file to your repository (root), e.g. something like the following:

# Ignore target directory
target

Edit: Sorry, too fast on the trigger there. This will ignore the target file for both remotes. To include some files in your deployment remote, you should probably use different branches.

One branch for your deployment and one for your source. Whenever you deploy, merge differences from source branch to deployment branch. In the deployment branch, your .gitignore file could look differently.

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What about having a deploy branch, whose upstream would be your remote deployment branch, and where you don't ignore the build/ directory?
You would then have to merge your development branch into deploy before each deployement.

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