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It seems to me that file writing in Ruby MRI 1.8.7 is completely thread safe.

Example 1 - Flawless Results:

File.open("test.txt", "a") { |f|
  threads = []
  1_000_000.times do |n|
    threads << Thread.new do
      f << "#{n}content\n"
    end
  end
  threads.each { |t| t.join }
}

Example 2 - Flawless Results (but slower):

threads = []
100_000.times do |n|
  threads << Thread.new do
    File.open("test2.txt", "a") { |f|
      f << "#{n}content\n"
    }
  end
end
threads.each { |t| t.join }

So, I couldn't reconstruct a scenario where I face concurrency problems, can you?

I would appreciate if somebody could explain to me why I should still use Mutex here.

EDIT: here is another more complicated example which works perfectly fine and doesn't show concurrency problems:

def complicated(n)
  n.to_s(36).to_a.pack("m").strip * 100
end

items = (1..100_000).to_a

threads = []
10_000.times do |thread|
  threads << Thread.new do
    while item = items.pop

      sleep(rand(100) / 1000.0)
      File.open("test3.txt", "a") { |f|
        f << "#{item} --- #{complicated(item)}\n"
      }

    end
  end
end
threads.each { |t| t.join }
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was not able to produce an error either.

You are probably running into a file lock here. If you wish for multiple threads to write to the same file, they should all use the same file-object like so:

threads = []
File.open("test.txt", "a") do |fp|
  500.times do |time|
    threads << Thread.new do
      fp.puts("#{time}: 1")
      sleep(rand(100) / 100.0)
      fp.puts("#{time}: 2")
    end
  end
end

threads.each{ |thread| thread.join }

The GIL will probably save you from any real thread-bugs in this example, but I am not really sure, what would happen under JRuby, which is using real threads and two writes might occur at the exact same time. The same goes for other Ruby-engines with real threadding.

Regarding the question of wherever you should protect your code with locks comes down to, if you want to rely on the Ruby-engine you are using should save you, or you want to code a solution that "should" work on all Ruby-engines, regardless of if they have built-in functionality to save you from concurrency problems.

Another question is if your operation-system and/or file-system is saving you from thread-bugs with file locks, and if your code should be operating-system and/or file-system independent, meaning that you wont depend on file-system locks to ensure, that your file-opening and writes are being properly synchronized by the operation-system and/or file-system.

I will go out on a limb and say, that it seems like good practice, that you also implement locks on your side, to ensure that your code keeps working regardless of which Ruby-engine, operating-system or file-system someone else is going to use your code on, even though most modern Ruby-engines, operating-systems and file-systems have these features built-in.

share|improve this answer
    
sounds good, but are there disadvantages when using Locks? (performance?) –  Benedikt B Feb 27 '13 at 13:50
    
Running this benchmark link benchmarks 100,000 locks in 10 threads (1 mill. total locks) with Mutex and Monitor to 0.28 and 0.72 seconds on MRI 1.9.3 and 2.13 and 5.13 seconds on JRuby 1.7.3 on my laptop with an i7 3740QM CPU. Since you will be probably be using way less locks, you performance losses would be minimal. –  Kasper Johansen Feb 27 '13 at 14:56
    
Thanks for looking into this. –  Benedikt B Feb 28 '13 at 13:40
    
No problem mate! Always fun to play around with thread- and lock-related problems! :-) –  Kasper Johansen Feb 28 '13 at 18:53
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