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I am accessing a database that I can't change and it has a column named valid defined. Anytime I try to access an attribute, I get this exception:

valid? is defined by ActiveRecord (ActiveRecord::DangerousAttributeError)

The exception makes sense, but since I'm not able to change the database, how can I get around this error?

I tried "overriding" the attribute, but I don't know how to remove the original column. I can successfully call this valid_column method, but any time I try to access another attribute defined in the database, I get the same exception. It still seems to be trying to map the valid column.

  def valid_column=(valid)
    write_attribute(:valid, valid)
  end
  def valid_column
      read_attribute(:valid)
  end

I'm not sure if it matters, but here are the details of my environment:

  • Windows Ruby 1.8.6
  • Informix database on a Linux server
  • activerecord (2.3.4)
  • activerecord-informix-adapter (1.0.0.9250)
  • ruby-informix (0.7.1)

Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this:

class MyTable < AR:Base
   class << self
     def instance_method_already_implemented?(method_name)
       return true if method_name == 'valid'
       super
     end
   end
end

It's a hack, and it might not work in rails 3, but it could fix the problem for now.

I found it on the ruby on rails mailing list

If you wanted, you could also look at datamapper, which handles these sort of things somewhat more sanely.

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1  
You might need to change return true if method_name == 'valid' to return true if method_name == 'valid?' in order to get it to work. I did. –  Jason Swett Dec 4 '12 at 16:42
    
The question mark seems to be needed in rails 3. –  Kelvin Jul 16 '13 at 20:21

For reads you might be able to use SQL's select-as statement. Not sure if the following will work, but a default scope may make this easily do-able.

class MyRecord < ActiveRecord::Base
    default_scope :select=> 'valid as valid_column'
end
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Use safe_attributes - https://github.com/bjones/safe_attributes . It works perfectly out of the box:

class WebsiteUser < ActiveRecord::Base
    establish_connection 'cf_website'
    set_table_name 'nc_users'
    bad_attribute_names :hash    
end
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Without worrying about ActiveRecord's reserved attributes, just add a gem in your gemfile and the gem will take care of name collisions automatically.

gem 'safe_attributes'

http://goo.gl/OO2H7

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what if the object is already created? I'm getting an error on my object when trying to access myobj.association. The object was created prior to adding the gem to my gemfile. Thanks. –  moopasta Jun 2 '13 at 17:09

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