Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why Connecting using include once is failing with pdo?
When I connect to the database including a connection page it gave me an error, but when I put the connecting code in and I remove include I do not get errors. What might be the problem?

Error Fatal error: Call to a member function prepare() on a non-object in C:\wamp\www\tish\A\view.php on line 167

Connecting page:

<?php
  function connected_Db(){
    try {
      $con = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=tish_database;charset=utf8','root','');
    } catch(PDOException $e){
      echo 'Connection failed'.$e->getMessage();
    }
  }
  connected_Db();
?>

the way I include it in other pages:

include_once('pdo.inc.php');
connected_Db();
global $con;
share|improve this question
2  
Where's the rest of the code? You're missing at least $con->prepare() somewhere –  sjdaws Feb 27 '13 at 10:10
    
can you make sure the file is being included properly? Are both files in same directory ? –  Minesh Feb 27 '13 at 10:10
    
@Minesh Yes they are both in the same Directory –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:13
1  
@sjdaws not beause if I connect directly it works and I did not post the other page not to get people bored of the long codes please check it on pastebin.com/fttmjuda –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't make a function variable global from the global scope. The variable $con has long been GC'ed: it's deallocated once the function has returned. Try this:

function connected_Db()
{
   return new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=tish_database;charset=utf8','root','');
}
//global scope:
$con = connect_Db();

If you insist on using the global keyword, which is not a great idea, you should've used it like this:

function connected_Db()
{
    global $con;//use the global var, set at top of function
    $con = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=tish_database;charset=utf8','root','');
}
$con = null;// declare global var (optional, but a notice will be issued if not declared)
connect_Db();
var_dump($con);

As you can see, I have -like deceze and YourCommonSense suggested- removed the try-catch block (which you don't need here). It also goes to show that you don't really need the function call either. Your script would work perfectly fine (or marginally faster even) if you were to write this:

//global scope (or whatever scope you need it to be)
$con = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=tish_database;charset=utf8','root','');

That way, you're not calling a function that needn't be called.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for catch and echoing an error –  Your Common Sense Feb 27 '13 at 10:21
    
@YourCommonSense: addressed the issue, and added suggestion of not using a function call at all. Try-Catch-Echo construct was a copy paste of OP anyway... –  Elias Van Ootegem Feb 27 '13 at 10:25
    
Good great help appreciated I am still comparing the answers but yours is one of the most relevant –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:30

You never make $con available outside of the function connected_Db. Learn about variable scope. You should return it from the function and use it like so:

require_once 'pdo.inc.php';

$con = connected_Db();

Which also means you should not catch connection errors (at least not there), since if the function can't return a PDO connection your script doesn't need to continue.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for "you should not catch". –  Your Common Sense Feb 27 '13 at 10:17

First, you need to tell PDO to throw exceptions on connect errors.
Next, you shouldn't catch them, at least not using try .. catch.

So, the code have to be

pdo.inc.php:

<?php
function connected_Db(){
    $dsn  = 'mysql:host=localhost;dbname=tish_database;charset=utf8';
    $opt  = array(
        PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE            => PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION,
        PDO::ATTR_DEFAULT_FETCH_MODE => PDO::FETCH_ASSOC
    );
    return new PDO($dsn,'root','', $opt);
}

(you may also wish to pass connect options via function parameters)

other file

include_once('pdo.inc.php');
$con = connected_Db();
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm sorry, but "merely copy-pasted from the manual page"? I don't copy-paste lest I mention the source. I copied the OP's code, and changed the assignment to a return statement. After your just comment I also removed the try-catch block. I can't help finding your accusations slightly offensive –  Elias Van Ootegem Feb 27 '13 at 10:38
    
@Your Common Sense You always come the best if it comes to answers and I am using now yours bacause I feel save with your answer and it worked 100% –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:41
    
@Elias The Colonel often is offensive, but he's usually also right. ;) –  deceze Feb 27 '13 at 10:42
1  
@Elias Van Ootegem please forgive him on my behalf because its my question all maybe caused this But all I would say guys I thank you all for comming out and help me all answers are relevant here thats why I credited them all although I had to chose 1 –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:44
    
@deceze: fair enough... he is indeed. I forgot this is the internet, a place where generalizations roam freely and reign supreme... in general, that is. I just get rather touchy when I feel I'm being accused of intellectual theft. Mustn't cry about it ;-) to humphrey: Don't worry about it –  Elias Van Ootegem Feb 27 '13 at 10:48

You're using global incorrectly. It should go in the function, to specify that the variable is from outside the function, i.e. in the global scope.

e.g.

function connected_Db()
{
    global $con;

    $con = null;
    try
    {
       $con = new PDO(...);
    }
    catch(PDOException $e)
    {
        die('Could not connect: '.$e->getMessage());
    }
}

But it's better to return the connection rather than pull it in from global scope.

i.e.

function connected_Db()
{
    try
    {
       return new PDO(...);
    }
    catch(PDOException $e)
    {
        die('Could not connect: '.$e->getMessage());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 for catch and die –  Your Common Sense Feb 27 '13 at 10:20
    
It's a trivial example of how to use global. Whether exiting the script is the right thing to do is up to the developer. If all the function is going to do is call "new PDO()" and return the result, there's no need for the function, and an echo just as much probably doesn't belong there, if you want to get picky. –  Daren Chandisingh Feb 27 '13 at 10:22
    
Your answer worked first for me thanks let me test also other peoples answer then I will decide "appreciated" –  humphrey Feb 27 '13 at 10:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.