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I have two tables that are joined together.

A has many B

Normally you would do:

select * from a,b where b.a_id = a.id

To get all of the records from a that has a record in b.

How do I get just the records in a that does not have anything in b?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted
select * from a where id not in (select a_id from b)

Or like some other people on this thread says:

select a.* from a
left outer join b on a.id = b.a_id
where b.a_id is null
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You beat me to it by five seconds! <grin> –  BlackWasp Sep 29 '08 at 22:58
    
wow.. identical answers! –  Marcel Tjandraatmadja Sep 29 '08 at 22:59
    
somethimes you win, sometimes you lose =P –  albertein Sep 29 '08 at 22:59
    
well, there isn't too many ways to do that –  albertein Sep 29 '08 at 22:59
    
Ah well. Never mind eh? :-D –  BlackWasp Sep 29 '08 at 23:00
select * from a
left outer join b on a.id = b.a_id
where b.a_id is null
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I think this left outer join will perform much better than the 'in' clause, unless the query optimizer treats them the same... –  Codewerks Sep 29 '08 at 23:09
    
It pretty much does. Check it out. –  David B Sep 29 '08 at 23:12
    
Yeah, interestingly, the query plan has an extra strep (Filter) for the left join and the 'where in' is resolved to a 'right anti semi join'...whatever that is... –  Codewerks Sep 29 '08 at 23:14

Another approach:

select * from a where not exists (select * from b where b.a_id = a.id)

The "exists" approach is useful if there is some other "where" clause you need to attach to the inner query.

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select * from a where id not in (select a_id from b)

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This will be extremely expensive as the engine has to generate the the subquery in its entirety before it can begin to eliminate the tuples from a. Not a good idea in general. –  dland Sep 30 '08 at 11:07
SELECT id FROM a
EXCEPT
SELECT a_id FROM b;
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The EXCEPT keyword is MINUS in Oracle. –  onedaywhen Mar 13 '12 at 10:43

You will probably get a lot better performance (than using 'not in') if you use an outer join:

select * from a left outer join b on a.id = b.a_id where b.a_id is null;
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Another way of writing it

select a.* from a left outer join b on a.id = b.id where b.id is null

Ouch, beaten by Nathan :)

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This will protect you from nulls in the IN clause, which can cause unexpected behavior.

select * from a where id not in (select [a id] from b where [a id] is not null)

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You are better off using a left outer join rather than using an IN predicate in the first place. –  dland Sep 30 '08 at 11:07
    
Any reason for this opinion? –  David B Sep 30 '08 at 12:44

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