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I am currently in the process of adding CodeContracts to my existing code base.
One thing that proves difficult is the usage of entities that are hydrated by NHibernate.

Assume this simple class:

public class Post
{
    private Blog _blog;

    [Obsolete("Required by NHibernate")]
    protected Post() { }

    public Post(Blog blog)
    {
        Contract.Requires(blog != null);
        _blog = blog;
    }

    public Blog Blog
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<Blog>() != null);
            return _blog;
        }
        set
        {
            Contract.Requires(value != null);
            _blog = value;
        }
    }

    [ContractInvariantMethod]
    private void Invariants()
    {
        Contract.Invariant(_blog != null);
    }
}

This class tries to protect the invariant _blog != null. However, it currently fails, because I easily could create an instance of Post by deriving from it and using the protected constructor. In that case _blog would be null.
I am trying to change my code-base in a way that the invariants are indeed protected.

The protected constructor is at first sight needed by NHibernate to be able to create new instances, but there is a way around this requirement.
That approach basically uses FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject. The important point is, that this method doesn't run any constructors.
I could use this approach and it would allow me to get rid of the protected constructor. The static checker of CodeContracts would now be happy and not report any more violations, but as soon as NHibernate tries to hydrate such entities it will generate "invariant failed" exceptions, because it tries to set one property after the other and every property setter executes code that verifies the invariants.

So, to make all this work, I will have to ensure that the entities are instantiated via their public constructor.

But how would I do this?

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2 Answers 2

Daniel, if I'm not mistaken (it's been a while since I worked with NH) you can have a private constructor and he still should be fine creating your object.

Aside from that, why do you need to be a 100% sure? Is it a requirement in some way or you are just trying to covering all the bases?

I ask that because depending on the requirement we could come with another way of achieving it.

What you COULD do right now to provide that extra protection is wire up an IInterceptor class to make sure that after the load your class is still valid.

I guess that the bottom line is if someone want's to mess up with your domain and classes they WILL do it no matter what you do. The effort to prevent all that stuff doesn't pay off in most cases.

Edit after clarification

If you use your objects to write to the database and you contracts are working you can safely assume that the data will be written correctly and therefore loaded correctly if no one tampers with the database.

If you do change the database manually you should either stop doing it and use your domain to do that (that's where the validation logic is) or test the database changing process.

Still, if you really need that you can still hook up a IInterceptor that will validate your entity after the load, but I don't think you fix a water flooding coming from the street by making sure your house pipe is fine.

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Thanks for your answer. As far as I am aware, a private constructor never was an option - at least not if you didn't want to create those interceptor classes. The purpose is not to defend against malicious users. The purpose is to fail fast in case of a bug in code or data. If the data in the database doesn't conform to the contract - maybe because the latest database update didn't go through properly? - I want to get an exception as soon as NHibernate tries to hydrate such an object. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 27 '13 at 12:20
    
I updated my answer –  tucaz Feb 27 '13 at 12:37
    
Thanks. I don't agree with the update though. There are two systems in place here: The database and the application. Both protect their boundaries. The database via FKs, PKs, unique indexes etc. And the application via code contracts. It's not about validation, really. It's about having a valid object. One of the purposes of Code Contracts is to fail fast. And that's what I want to do. As I said before, no one needs to "tamper" with anything for a contract to break. A small bug in the mapping is all that's needed. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 27 '13 at 12:48
    
And I rather have a contract violation exception "requires InvoiceNumber != null" when the entity is constructed than a random NullReferenceException somewhere in my code. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 27 '13 at 12:48
    
What you are trying to achieve is very hard and personally I've never seen a good solution for it before. I've been where you are and I when the answer started to get as complex as it's getting I realized it wasn't worth it. ORM's (at least NH) are not compatible to this kind of validation out of the box. What I ended up doing is having a IsValid method and calling that before saving and after loading the entity. You could add it as part of a IEntityValidator interface and intercept NH after it loads calling IsValid method. –  tucaz Feb 27 '13 at 12:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the discussion with tucaz, I came up with the following, in its core rather simple solution:

The heart of this solution is the class NHibernateActivator. It has two important purposes:

  1. Create an instance of an object without invoking its constructors. It uses FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject for this.
  2. Prevent the triggering of "invariant failed" exceptions while NHibernate hydrates the instance. This is a two-step task: Disable invariant checking before NHibernate starts hydrating and re-enable invariant checking after NHibernate is done.
    The first part can be performed directly after the instance has been created.
    The second part is using the interface IPostLoadEventListener.

The class itself is pretty simple:

public class NHibernateActivator : INHibernateActivator, IPostLoadEventListener
{
    public bool CanInstantiate(Type type)
    {
        return !type.IsAbstract && !type.IsInterface &&
               !type.IsGenericTypeDefinition && !type.IsSealed;
    }

    public object Instantiate(Type type)
    {
        var instance = FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(type);
        instance.DisableInvariantEvaluation();
        return instance;
    }

    public void OnPostLoad(PostLoadEvent @event)
    {
        if (@event != null && @event.Entity != null)
            @event.Entity.EnableInvariantEvaluation(true);
    }
}

DisableInvariantEvaluation and EnableInvariantEvaluation are currently extension methods that use reflection to set a protected field. This field prevents invariants from being checked. Furthermore EnableInvariantEvaluation will execute the method that checks the invariants if it gets passed true:

public static class CodeContractsExtensions
{
    public static void DisableInvariantEvaluation(this object entity)
    {
        var evaluatingInvariantField = entity.GetType()
                                             .GetField(
                                                 "$evaluatingInvariant$", 
                                                 BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                                 BindingFlags.Instance);
        if (evaluatingInvariantField == null)
            return;
        evaluatingInvariantField.SetValue(entity, true);
    }

    public static void EnableInvariantEvaluation(this object entity,
                                                 bool evaluateNow)
    {
        var evaluatingInvariantField = entity.GetType()
                                             .GetField(
                                                 "$evaluatingInvariant$", 
                                                 BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                                 BindingFlags.Instance);
        if (evaluatingInvariantField == null)
            return;
        evaluatingInvariantField.SetValue(entity, false);

        if (!evaluateNow)
            return;
        var invariantMethod = entity.GetType()
                                    .GetMethod("$InvariantMethod$",
                                               BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                               BindingFlags.Instance);
        if (invariantMethod == null)
            return;
        invariantMethod.Invoke(entity, new object[0]);
    }
}

The rest is NHibernate plumbing:

  1. We need to implement an interceptor that uses our activator.
  2. We need to implement an reflection optimizer that returns our implementation of IInstantiationOptimizer. This implementation in turn again uses our activator.
  3. We need to implement a proxy factory that uses our activator.
  4. We need to implement IProxyFactoryFactory to return our custom proxy factory.
  5. We need to create a custom proxy validator that doesn't care whether the type has a default constructor.
  6. We need to implement a bytecode provider that returns our reflection optimizer and proxy-factory factory.
  7. NHibernateActivator needs to be registered as a listener using config.AppendListeners(ListenerType.PostLoad, ...); in ExposeConfiguration of Fluent NHibernate.
  8. Our custom bytecode provider needs to be registered using Environment.BytecodeProvider.
  9. Our custom interceptor needs to be registered using config.Interceptor = ...;.

I will update this answer when I had the chance to create a coherent package out of all this and put it on github.
Furthermore, I want to get rid of the reflection and create a proxy type instead that can directly access the protected CodeContract members.

For reference, the following blog posts where helpful in implementing the several NHibernate interfaces:


Unfortunately, this currently fails for entities with composite keys, because the reflection optimizer is not used for them. This is actually a bug in NHibernate and I reported it here.

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Although it uses a lot of complex extension points and hidden methods its a simple solution. Awesome! –  tucaz Feb 28 '13 at 19:17

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