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I was thinking this morning here, what would be the fastest way to reverse a number of positive to negative and from negative to positive, of course, the simplest way might be:

int a = 10;
a = a*(-1);

or

int a = 10;
a = -a;

But then, I thought, I take that to do this, using commands shift and pointers ... That really would be possible to change the sign of a value, using commands shift operators and memory?

share|improve this question
20  
The compiler will probably optimize such simple things. Try for yourself. – Zeta Feb 27 '13 at 11:54
4  
agree with Zeta. Go for what is most readable – Default Feb 27 '13 at 11:55
    
I do not understand the context of this problem. If you are not happy with c optimizations, go ahead and use assembly. Honestly, this sounds like premature optimization. if you are interested in how to negate something in "low level way", look at two's complement. cs.cornell.edu/~tomf/notes/cps104/twoscomp.html – Dmitry Feb 27 '13 at 11:56
1  
Not sure what you want to do with "pointers" and why you think using them would be faster than a = -a;. In fact, I don't understand why you think the compiler would not necessarily use the most efficient implementation when compiling a = -a;. – Mr Lister Feb 27 '13 at 11:57
2  
Rule 1 of compiled languages: don't lie to the compiler; it'll come back and bite you later. If you find the compiler does a poor job then submit a bug report to the developers. Optimize your algorithms, not your basic operations. – ams Feb 27 '13 at 12:08
up vote 14 down vote accepted

The first produces:

    .file   "optimum.c"
    .def    ___main;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .text
.globl _main
    .def    _main;  .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    subl    $16, %esp
    call    ___main
    movl    $10, 12(%esp) ;i = 10
    negl    12(%esp)      ;i = -i
    movl    $0, %eax
    leave
    ret

The second one produces:

    .file   "optimum.c"
    .def    ___main;    .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
    .text
.globl _main
    .def    _main;  .scl    2;  .type   32; .endef
_main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    subl    $16, %esp
    call    ___main
    movl    $10, 12(%esp)   ;i = 10
    negl    12(%esp)        ;i = -i
    movl    $0, %eax
    leave
    ret

Same output! No difference in the assembly code produced.

--------------------------EDIT, OP ANSWERS HE USES VC++2012, INTEL ARCH-------------------

Compiled using cl optimum.c /Fa optimum.asm

; Listing generated by Microsoft (R) Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.30319.01 

    TITLE   C:\Users\Dell\Downloads\TTH\TTH\TTH\optimum.c
    .686P
    .XMM
    include listing.inc
    .model  flat

INCLUDELIB LIBCMT
INCLUDELIB OLDNAMES

PUBLIC  _main
; Function compile flags: /Odtp
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_a$ = -4                        ; size = 4
_argc$ = 8                      ; size = 4
_argv$ = 12                     ; size = 4
_main   PROC
; File c:\users\dell\downloads\tth\tth\tth\optimum.c
; Line 4
    push    ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push    ecx
; Line 5
    mov DWORD PTR _a$[ebp], 10          ; 0000000aH
; Line 6
    mov eax, DWORD PTR _a$[ebp]
    neg eax ;1 machine cycle!
    mov DWORD PTR _a$[ebp], eax
; Line 7
    xor eax, eax
; Line 8
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    ret 0
_main   ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
END

and with second approach (a = a * -1)

; Listing generated by Microsoft (R) Optimizing Compiler Version 16.00.30319.01 

    TITLE   C:\Users\Dell\Downloads\TTH\TTH\TTH\optimum.c
    .686P
    .XMM
    include listing.inc
    .model  flat

INCLUDELIB LIBCMT
INCLUDELIB OLDNAMES

PUBLIC  _main
; Function compile flags: /Odtp
_TEXT   SEGMENT
_a$ = -4                        ; size = 4
_argc$ = 8                      ; size = 4
_argv$ = 12                     ; size = 4
_main   PROC
; File c:\users\dell\downloads\tth\tth\tth\optimum.c
; Line 4
    push    ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push    ecx
; Line 5
    mov DWORD PTR _a$[ebp], 10          ; 0000000aH
; Line 6
    mov eax, DWORD PTR _a$[ebp]
    imul    eax, -1 ;1 instruction, 3 machine/cycles :|
    mov DWORD PTR _a$[ebp], eax
; Line 7
    xor eax, eax
; Line 8
    mov esp, ebp
    pop ebp
    ret 0
_main   ENDP
_TEXT   ENDS
END
share|improve this answer
1  
With that compiler... – Mats Petersson Feb 27 '13 at 12:04
1  
gcc with no optimizations! gcc -c optimum.c -S -o optimum.s – Aniket Feb 27 '13 at 12:04
7  
@MrLister any decent self-respecting compiler will produce the same(similar) code. – Aniket Feb 27 '13 at 12:06
1  
The point is: don't guess, don't assume, don't read minds :) The question was about C or C++ in general. But indeed it doesn't make any sense at all to attempt manual optimizations unless you have in-depth knowledge of the particular CPU. 99% of all programmers do not have better knowledge of such things than the person who wrote the compiler port for the specific CPU. – Lundin Feb 27 '13 at 12:26
1  
@Aniket You should be able to see his edit in the edit history. It was movl $10, 12(%esp) // i = 10 and negl 12(%esp) // i = -i respectively. @GrijeshChauhan it is considered better to suggest such changes to the poster through comments rather than to edit the post yourself, as you would be changing the meaning of the contents. – Lundin Feb 27 '13 at 12:46

Use something that is readable, such as

a *= -1;

or

a = -a;

Leave the rest to the optimizer.

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Assuming the processor is at least somewhat competent and has sizeof(int) == sizeof(Cpu_register), then a "make this number negative" will be a single instruction (usually called neg) [well, may need the value loading and storing too, but if you are using the variable for anything else, it can remain after the load, and only be stored later one...]

Multiplying by -1 is most likely slower than a = -a;, but most competent compilers should be able to make both of these equivalent.

So, just write the code clearly, and the rest should take care of itself. Negating a number is not a difficult operation in most processors. If you are using some unusual processsor, then look at the compiler output, and see what it does.

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The other answers have correctly indicated that readability matters more:

  • You should forget about speed and choose the idiom that you find most readable.
  • Almost all compilers generate equivalent optimal code (probably a single instruction) for anything like a = -a, a *= -1 etc.
    • But though MSVS 2012 (optimised?) uses one instruction for each, they take 1 cycle for = -a and 3 for *= -1.
  • Any attempt to make it faster will make it far less readable and could easily make it slower.
  • If you need to optimise, you should start by analysing generated code and performance.


There is however a practical advantage to the *= -1 idiom: you only have to write the left hand side once, it is only evaluated once – and the reader only has to read it once! This is relevant when the LHS is long, complex or expensive or may have side-effects:

(valid ? a : b)[prime_after(i++)] *= -1;
*look_up (input) *= -1;  // Where look_up may have side-effects
parity[state][(unsigned int)getc(stdin)] *= -1;
variable_with_a_long_explanatory_name *= -1;

And once one has adopted an idiom, one tends to stick with it in other situations.

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You can try

int a = 10;
a= ~a+1;

but you shouldn't worry about that, because compiler makes it in the best way.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be an illustration of precisely why this sort of optimization is a bad idea. As written, it is both more operations and less readable. A decent compiler will help you with the first issue, but not the second one. – rici Feb 27 '13 at 13:18
1  
@rici and non-portable, as it relies on two's complement. – Gauthier May 27 '15 at 15:08

Also 0 - n

Gcc emits the "neg" instruction for all four cases: -n, 0 - n, n * -1, and ~n + 1

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protected by Marco A. Dec 12 '14 at 15:26

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