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Let's say that I want to write a game (in C) which ask the user whether he wants to play again after the game is over.

I see two obvious ways to write that.

First:

int main(void)
{
    /* variable declarations and initializations */

    do { /* optionally multiple games */

        /* game code here */
        ........

        /* prompt user wheter he wants to play again */
        bool playagain = playagain();

    } while(playagain);

    .....
}

And second:

int main(void)
{
    /* variable declarations and initializations */

game_start: /* optionally multiple games */

    /* game code here */
    ........

    /* prompt user wheter he wants to play again */
    bool playagain = playagain();

    if (playagain)
        goto game_start;

    .....
}

I know that generally it's a bad idea to use goto statements, but I think here it makes the code clearer and saves us from an extra indentation level.

So my question is, does this particular example considered a proper way of using the goto statement or should I avoid it anyway?

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closed as not constructive by Jens Gustedt, CharlesB, Peter DeWeese, ppeterka, Stephan Feb 27 '13 at 15:35

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2  
I think that peoples problem with goto isn't using 1 goto, it's when it grows to 10 or 100. With the loop you clearly see the scope, with a goto it can be anywhere. –  dutt Feb 27 '13 at 12:24
1  
It's a matter of taste. I don't see anything wrong with using goto at all. Why would it be bad? –  Art Feb 27 '13 at 12:25
1  
@Art: you clearly never did any BASIC programming! –  ams Feb 27 '13 at 12:26
1  
@KBart he's just writing a loop with a goto, why is it a good case for using a goto? –  LtWorf Feb 27 '13 at 12:54
2  
I really can't see how that goto makes the code clearer. Extra indentation? Use a loop without indentation if you really hate it. –  effeffe Feb 27 '13 at 13:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After over 40 years of debating goto, there is still no consensus among all programmers in the world.

The most common opinion (?) is that goto is fine in a few rare cases, and in such cases it should only be used to jump downwards. One such example is breaking out of multiple tested loops or statements. Another example is error handling where you jump to a label at the end of the function, a "poor man's exception handling".

Some people believe that goto is considered harmful and shall never be used in any circumstances, since the goto keyword can always be replaced by other language mechanisms.

Personally I prefer to never use goto, mainly to avoid debate, but instead I use a very similar construct, with functions:

int main()
{
  while (play_a_game())
    ;
}

bool play_a_game (void)
{
  game();      

  return play_again();
}

Similarly, you can break out of multiple loops using a return statement from a function, rather than goto. Ironically, C programmers rarely have a problem with function returns, or break statements, but they see red whenever goto shows up, even though the resulting machine code will most likely be the same.

As a rule of thumb: whenever you worry about multiple layers of indention making the code unreadable, functions is always the solution.

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This is not the better example, in K&R you can find a good one:

C provides the infinitely-abusable goto statement, and labels to branch to. Formally, the goto statement is never necessary, and in practice it is almost always easy to write code without it. We have not used goto in this book. Nevertheless, there are a few situations where gotos may find a place. The most common is to abandon processing in some deeply nested structure, such as breaking out of two or more loops at once. The break statement cannot be used directly since it only exits from the innermost loop. Thus:

         for ( ... )
              for ( ... ) {
                  ...
                  if (disaster)
                       goto error;
              }
         ...
   error:
         /* clean up the mess */

This organization is handy if the error-handling code is non-trivial, and if errors can occur in several places.

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2  
It's a legit example, but IMO a better solution is to write the nested loop in a separate function and use the return statement, or to use try-catch blocks (not specific to C) –  Markus Unterwaditzer Feb 27 '13 at 12:33
    
@MarkusUnterwaditzer, I agree –  Alter Mann Feb 27 '13 at 12:35
1  
@MarkusUnterwaditzer Because C doesn't have exceptions, this particular use of goto can be the best way to solve some problems. Naturally it would be better to use exceptions, but if the language doesn't support them, that's not a very constructive comment. –  David Heffernan Feb 27 '13 at 12:38
    
@DavidHeffernan Still the new-func-option remains, and yeah, that's the reason i wrote "not specific to C". –  Markus Unterwaditzer Feb 27 '13 at 12:40

Generally, people who use C hate gotos because they see "getting away from needing gotos" to be one of the reasons to use C to begin with.

Once you decide you want to use gotos, go ahead, and use them. However in general, it leads to confusing code that you will have a hard time asking questions about on stack overflow.

I'd avoid gotos altogether.

In fact, the only reason I use gotos is when I want to write a program in C before writing an assignment program that requires to be written in assembly (which is much easier to visualize with gotos).

In any case, if you feel there are benefits to using gotos over "normal" control statements, go ahead and use them. But be warned, there be dragons.

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I think the point is that when you find a place to use a goto, often there is a cleaner solution that doesn't require it. Such as deeply nested code. goto are an accepted way of exiting deeply nested loops, but often you can replace the loops with something a little cleaner. See: c2.com/cgi/wiki?GotoConsideredHarmful –  Mr. Shickadance Feb 27 '13 at 12:30
    
That is right, I was pushing for the idea that the whole main purpose of high level programming languages like fortran and C, was to create control statements like if and else and else if and loops and other fun stuff, to avoid having to jump around the code like a madman trying to follow program flow. –  Dmitry Feb 27 '13 at 12:32
1  
Er, C is one of the few languages in common use where goto is still widely used. People who want to stop using goto stop using C and start using languages with support for exceptions. –  David Heffernan Feb 27 '13 at 12:39
    
Heh, I sure have expected at least one "gotos are bad, dont use them" answer..;) –  KBart Feb 27 '13 at 12:48

In your second example you are basically writing a loop, but instead of using one of the existing and well known loop constructs, you use if+goto.

I'd say the 1st one is much more clear to understand.

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I would use rather the first one. Using goto isnt bad, if it is the best solution. For example if I'd have two nested switches and wanted to break in the second one from the first one I would use goto instead of an extra variable and condition. You can use whatever coding style you like but in general, we avoid using them because they can mess up our code easily. But still it's your choice.

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I use it, very seldom, as a way of "finalize".

fun () {
  d = getDatabaseConnection(...);
  if (d) {
    f = fopen(...);
    if (f) {
       ...do things...
       if (error(...)) {
         goto finalize;
       }
       ...do more things...
    }
  }

  finalize:
    if (f) fclose(f);
    if (d) closeDatabaseConnection(d);
}        
share|improve this answer
    
if (a) free(a); can be safely replaced with free(a). –  Lundin Feb 27 '13 at 13:33
    
okay, i change the code... –  Peter Miehle Feb 27 '13 at 13:49
    
There's no need to change anything :) As a parenthesis without any relevance to the original question, I merely wanted to point out that passing NULL to free() is safe. –  Lundin Feb 27 '13 at 14:20

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