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I'm trying to make a function that will compare multiple variables to an integer and output a string of three letters. I was wondering if there was a way to translate this into Python. So say:

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3
Mylist = []

if x or y or z == 0 :
    Mylist.append("c")
elif x or y or z == 1 :
    Mylist.append("d")
elif x or y or z== 2 :
    Mylist.append("e")
elif x or y or z == 3 : 
    Mylist.append("f")

which would return a list of

["c", "d", "f"]

Is something like this possible?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 78 down vote accepted

You misunderstand how boolean expressions work; they don't work like an English sentence and guess that you are talking about the same comparison for all names here. You are looking for:

if x == 1 or y == 1 or z == 1:

x and y are otherwise evaluated on their own (False if 0, True otherwise).

You can shorten that to:

if 1 in (x, y, z):

or better still:

if 1 in {x, y, z}:

using a set to take advantage of the constant-cost membership test (in takes a fixed amount of time whatever the left-hand operand is).

When you use or, python sees each side of the operator as separate expressions. The expression x or y == 1 is treated as first a boolean test for x, then if that is False, the expression y == 1 is tested.

This is due to operator precedence. The or operator has a lower precedence than the == test, so the latter is evaluated first.

However, even if this were not the case, and the expression x or y or z == 1 was actually interpreted as (x or y or z) == 1 instead, this would still not do what you expect it to do.

x or y or z would evaluate to the first argument that is 'truthy', e.g. not False, numeric 0 or empty (see boolean expressions for details on what Python considers false in a boolean context).

So for the values x = 2; y = 1; z = 0, x or y or z would resolve to 2, because that is the first true-like value in the arguments. Then 2 == 1 would be False, even though y == 1 would be True.

share|improve this answer
    
can you explain a bit more why the OP misunderstands booleans? –  Private Feb 27 '13 at 13:14
5  
I wouldn't be so quick to go for the set version. Tuple's are very cheap to create and iterate over. On my machine at least, tuples are faster than sets so long as the size of the tuple is around 4-8 elements. If you have to scan more than that, use a set, but if you are looking for an item out of 2-4 possibilities, a tuple is still faster! If you can arrange for the most likely case to be first in the tuple, the win is even bigger: (my test: timeit.timeit('0 in {seq}'.format(seq=tuple(range(9, -1, -1))))) –  IfLoop Oct 24 '13 at 15:27
2  
@dequestarmappartialsetattr: In Python 3.3 and up, the set is stored as a constant, bypassing the creation time altogether, eliminating the creation time. Tuples can be cheap to create as Python caches a bundle of them to avoid memory churn, making that the biggest difference with sets here. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 24 '13 at 15:29
1  
@dequestarmappartialsetattr: If you time just the membership test, for integers sets and tuples are equally fast for the ideal scenario; matching the first element. After that tuples lose out to sets. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 24 '13 at 15:37
    
@MartijnPieters: I was curious about the performance of set in this context after reading your excellent answer, so I did a quick check (posted as an answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/24680768/601626). It looks like for single 'if' statements, using lists or tuples may be a bit nippier than sets (presumably due to the cost of constructing the hash table to begin with). Concatenated boolean operators are the most performant in this case, but they're not nearly as readable. –  Rob Jul 10 at 15:49

Your problem is more easily addressed with a dictionary structure like:

x == 0
y == 1
z == 3
d = {0: 'c', 1:'d', 2:'e', 3:'f'}
MyList = [d[k] for k in [x, y, z]]
share|improve this answer
1  
Or even d = "cdef" which leads to MyList = ["cdef"[k] for k in [x, y, z]] –  aragaer Oct 24 '13 at 15:39
    
or map(lambda i: 'cdef'[i], [x, y, z]) –  dansalmo May 8 at 14:36

Just a quick note on the comprehensive answer by Martijn Peters. I was curious about the performance of set after reading his answer, so I set up a script to do a performance comparison between concatenated boolean operators (i.e. if x == 1 or y == 1:), and using the in operator on lists, tuples and sets on a Linux box using Python 3.4.

In terms of readability (and RSI prevention ;) ), the list, tuple and set approaches win hands down. However, if performance is of importance, then things get more interesting.

  • Single conditional statement, few elements to check: If you only have a single conditional statement and few (less than about 4 elements) to check, then boolean operators have the best performance. They're closely followed by tuples, then lists and sets. The low construction cost of tuples seems to be the deciding factor here. You'd need to be hard pressed for performance to choose boolean operators over tuples in this instance due to the poorer readability.
  • Single conditional statement, many elements to check: As the number of elements grows, tuples and lists start to gain in performance over boolean operators. Sets remain the least performant. So the order (from best to worst) is tuples, lists, boolean operators, sets.
  • Multiple conditional statements: If you're going to check the same set of elements against different values several times, then constructing one of the containers is well worth it. Not only is it more readable, but they start beating boolean operators in terms of performance. In particular, sets really start to shine as the number of conditionals increases, because their underlying hash map implementation and constant look-up time start to pay significant dividends.

So I'd say the rule of thumb should rather be: If you have multiple conditionals, prefer to use sets to get constant look-up time performance benefits, otherwise if you have a single conditional, prefer tuples for their low construction overhead.

I've attached the test snippet I based my observations on below, as well as some typical test runs on my machine (hopefully this result holds for other OS and hardware configurations). Based on helpful advice from Martijn Peters and Ned Deily, I ran the test using Python 3.4 (as it has a significant number of performance enhancements over 3.1). Note that the observations here still hold for Python 3.1 - it's just that as the number of elements increase, tuples and sets start outperforming boolean operators sooner in Python 3.4.

Test Code

To run this you can supply this script with three arguments: the first is the number of elements to check against, the second is the number of conditional statements (i.e. the number of times you will be checking the elements against a different value), and supplying a third argument will make the script dump the code it's generating for use in timeit runs.

#! /usr/bin/env python3.4

import sys
import timeit

# Timeit configuration: Increasing repeat_num and number will improve
# the confidence in the measurement, but will take longer to evaluate.

#   Number of times to repeat fresh setup before doing timeit runs
#   The value we search for is generated once per setup, and then reused
#   in the runs.
repeat_num=100
#   Number of timeit runs per setup
number=int(1e6)

# Code snippet configuration

#   Number of elements to compare against test value
number_of_elements = int(sys.argv[1]) if (len(sys.argv) >= 2) else 4
elem_range = range(number_of_elements)
#   Repeated if statements (check a different value against elements each time)
number_of_ifs = int(sys.argv[2]) if (len(sys.argv) >= 3) else 1

# Debug code snippets (prints them to std out)
debug = True if len(sys.argv) >= 4 else False

var_str = '\n'.join(["var{i} = random.randint(0,{n})". \
                    format(i=i,n=number_of_elements-1) \
                    for i in elem_range])
setup = """
import random

# Number to check against. It's randomly generated to fall over
# twice the range of the input values, so it'll hit the worst-case
# scenario (number not found) about half the time.

look_for = random.randint(0,{number_of_elements} * 2)

# String replacement to generate variables to use in the tests
{vars}
""".format(number_of_elements=number_of_elements,
           vars=var_str)

# Concatenated plain old boolean operators
boolean_or_str = ' or '.join(["var{i} == look_for ". \
                            format(i=i) \
                            for i in elem_range])
boolean_template = """
# if var1 == look_for or var2 == look_for or ... :
if {boolean_ors}:
    pass
""".format(boolean_ors=boolean_or_str)

# Sequences (list, tuple, set)
elements_str = ', '.join(["var{i}".format(i=i) \
                          for i in elem_range])
sequence_template_1 = """

seq = {{left}} {elements} {{right}}

""".format(elements=elements_str)

sequence_template_2 = """
if look_for in seq:
    pass
"""

boolean_code = '\nlook_for += 1\n'. \
               join([boolean_template for i in range(number_of_ifs)])

list_code  =   sequence_template_1.format(left='[', right=']') + \
               '\nlook_for += 1\n'. \
               join([sequence_template_2 for i in range(number_of_ifs)])

tuple_code =   sequence_template_1.format(left='(', right=',)') + \
               '\nlook_for += 1\n'. \
               join([sequence_template_2 for i in range(number_of_ifs)])

set_code =     sequence_template_1.format(left='{', right='}') + \
               '\nlook_for += 1\n'. \
               join([sequence_template_2 for i in range(number_of_ifs)])

if debug:
    print("-------------------------")
    print("Setup:")
    print(setup)
    print("-------------------------")
    print("Boolean code:")
    print(boolean_code)
    print("-------------------------")
    print("List code:")
    print(list_code)
    print("-------------------------")
    print("Tuple code:")
    print(tuple_code)
    print("-------------------------")
    print("Set code:")
    print(set_code)

# Now, we do a number of timeit runs, each with a slightly different setup
# (different number to look for different element variable values)
print("-------------------------")
print("Configuration:")
print("Number of elements to check against: ", number_of_elements)
print("Number of if statements: ", number_of_ifs)
print("-------------------------")
print("Concatenated boolean operators")
times = timeit.Timer(stmt=boolean_code,
                     setup=setup).repeat(repeat=repeat_num,number=number)
print(sum(times)/len(times))
print("List")
times = timeit.Timer(stmt=list_code,
                     setup=setup).repeat(repeat=repeat_num,number=number)
print(sum(times)/len(times))
print("Tuple")
times = timeit.Timer(stmt=tuple_code,
                     setup=setup).repeat(repeat=repeat_num,number=number)
print(sum(times)/len(times))
print("Set")
times = timeit.Timer(stmt=set_code,
                     setup=setup).repeat(repeat=repeat_num,number=number)
print(sum(times)/len(times))

Output for various test runs

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 1 1
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  1
Number of if statements:  1
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
0.04720154728034686
List
0.1159076899800857
Tuple
0.09028188558062539
Set
0.129861725030496

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 2 1
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  2
Number of if statements:  1
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
0.09284000133011432
List
0.14026693941072155
Tuple
0.11410538489020837
Set
0.15728381851986342

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 4 1
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  4
Number of if statements:  1
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
0.1606186537495523
List
0.19002580668005975
Tuple
0.16203603848036438
Set
0.21323672409023856

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 8 1
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  8
Number of if statements:  1
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
0.29099589903038575
List
0.30266587881014856
Tuple
0.26446766339984606
Set
0.3794296461701742

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 8 2
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  8
Number of if statements:  2
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
0.72575668718011
List
0.5834476069899392
Tuple
0.5514472340304201
Set
0.5143292916094652

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 8 3
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  8
Number of if statements:  3
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
1.1206072894899262
List
0.8317204932002642
Tuple
0.7932088614401437
Set
0.6047825810400537

sandbox_dir> python3.4 ./test.py 8 4
-------------------------
Configuration:
Number of elements to check against:  8
Number of if statements:  4
-------------------------
Concatenated boolean operators
1.497132119970047
List
1.0665056235700467
Tuple
1.034572634220458
Set
0.7063767710703541

(That's a bit tl;dr :P . In retrospect I should have put in the extra effort to make a little matplotlib graph of the results).

A note on construction cost

For reference, just looking at the construction cost of the various containers shows the following:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit("(5,0,1,-1,2)")
0.03501704200607492
>>> timeit.timeit("{5,0,1,-1,2}")
0.2365395599990734
>>> timeit.timeit("[5,0,1,-1,2]")
0.12244689899671357

Note that sets are nearly an order of magnitude slower to construct than tuples, so this overhead tends to dominate when working with small numbers of elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
Python 3.1 is obsolete and was early in the lifetime of Python 3. There have been many changes to Python 3 since then, particularly to improve performance. If you want to do performance measurements, use a current Python 3 (3.4.1 at the moment). –  Ned Deily Jul 11 at 20:46
    
@NedDeily - Thanks! I've updated my answer based on your input. –  Rob Jul 17 at 9:51
    
You are not making use of the optimisations the peephole optimiser applies to literals. seq = {1,2,3}, then if look_for in seq is not optimised, so you get a (global) name lookup. That's a slower lookup from if look_for in {1, 2, 3}:, where the optimiser replaces the set with a constant frozenset() object and does LOAD_CONST for just that object. The same applies to the list and tuple options (where both are stored as a constant tuple object). –  Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 10:27
    
Looking more closely, you are also not using literal values as elements. if look_for in { var0 } cannot be optimised either, as it has to do lookups on var0 too. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 10:41
2  
For what it is worth, tuple creation is faster because tuple object are cached for reuse –  Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 15:30

The direct way to write x or y or z == 0 is

if any(map((lambda value: value == 0), (x,y,z))):
    pass # write your logic.

But I dont think, you like it. :) And this way is ugly.

The other way (a better) is:

0 in (x, y, z)

BTW lots of ifs could be written as something like this

my_cases = {
    0: Mylist.append("c"),
    1: Mylist.append("d")
    # ..
}

for key in my_cases:
    if key in (x,y,z):
        my_cases[key]()
        break
share|improve this answer
    
In your example of the dict instead of a key, you will get errors because the return value of .append is None, and calling None gives an AttributeError. In general I agree with this method, though. –  SethMMorton Feb 8 at 20:57

To check if a value is contained within a set of variables you can use the inbuilt modules itertools and operator.

For example:

Imports:

from itertools import repeat
from operator import contains

Declare variables:

x = 0
y = 1
z = 3

Create mapping of values (in the order you want to check):

check_values = (0, 1, 3)

Use itertools to allow repetition of the variables:

check_vars = repeat((x, y, z))

Finally, use the map function to create an iterator:

checker = map(contains, check_vars, check_values)

Then, when checking for the values (in the original order), use next():

if next(checker)  # Checks for 0
    # Do something
    pass
elif next(checker)  # Checks for 1
    # Do something
    pass

etc...

This has an advantage over the lambda x: x in (variables) because operator is an inbuilt module and is faster and more efficient than using lambda which has to create a custom in-place function.

Another option for checking if there is a non-zero (or False) value in a list:

not (x and y and z)

Equivalent:

not all((x, y, z))
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the OP's question. It only covers the first case in the provided example. –  wallacer Jun 4 at 17:39
    
@wallacer I have edited the answer to answer other usage cases –  Bern Jun 5 at 11:41

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