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I am using Cygwin Perl on Windows XP.

Is there an equivalent of >nul 2>&1 of Batch in Perl?

Please refer Here.

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1  
Please give an example of what would you like to achive –  pmod Feb 27 '13 at 13:06
    
You can check stackoverflow.com/questions/7437433/… –  pmod Feb 27 '13 at 13:09
    
That linked question is completely different. (And if they're not supposed to be, why did you post two questions that are supposed to be the same?) –  ikegami Feb 27 '13 at 13:11
    
@ikegami - Thanks for the correction. –  daa Feb 27 '13 at 14:00
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3 Answers 3

If you have a shell command:

system("$cmd >nul 2>&1");
die $! if $? < 0;
die "Child killed by signal ".($? & 0x7F)."\n" if $? & 0x7F;
die "Child exited with error ".($? >> 8)."\n" if $? >> 8;

If you have a program and args:

use IPC::Open3 qw( open3 );

open(local *CHILD_STDIN,  '<', 'nul') or die $!;
open(local *CHILD_STDOUT, '>', 'nul') or die $!;
my $pid = open3(
   '<&CHILD_STDIN',
   '>&CHILD_STDOUT',
   undef,  # 2>&1
   $prog, @args,
);
waitpid($pid, 0);
die $! if $? < 0;
die "Child killed by signal ".($? & 0x7F)."\n" if $? & 0x7F;
die "Child exited with error ".($? >> 8)."\n" if $? >> 8;

Note: Dies if there's an error launching the child.

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Cygwin works like Unix, where the null device is named /dev/null rather than nul. Running an external command and squelching all output is

system("mycommand arg1 arg2 >/dev/null 2>&1") == 0
    or warn "$0: mycommand exited $?";

To bypass shell parsing, do you also have to perform the redirections yourself.

use POSIX '_exit';  # if not available, fall back to plain exit with caveats

my $pid = fork;
die "$0: fork: $!" unless defined $pid;

if ($pid) {
    if (waitpid $pid, 0 >= 0) {
        my $status = $? >> 8;
        if ($status == 13) {
            warn "$0: error starting mycommand";
        }
        else {
            warn "$0: mycommand exited $status";
        }
    }
    else {
        warn "$0: waitpid: $!";
    }
}
else {
    open STDOUT, ">",  "/dev/null"   or warn("$0: open: $!"), _exit 13;
    open STDERR, ">&", \*STDOUT      or                       _exit 13;
    exec "mycommand", "arg1", "arg2" or                       _exit 13;
}
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Your second snippet misreports errors executing the command as errors being returned by the command. It also calls destructors it shouldn't because exit was used instead of _exit. open3 doesn't suffer from either of those problems. It's also shorter to use. –  ikegami Feb 27 '13 at 16:10
    
$? isn't the exit code. $? >> 8 is. –  ikegami Feb 27 '13 at 16:12
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As I wrote in my answer to your previous question, what you want is

system('cmd /C', $exe, @parm, '1>nul', '2>nul');
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According to the docs for system, that's equivalent to "cmd /C" "exe" "parm1" "1>nul" "2>nul", which is wrong on many levels. However, system doesn't behave as document in Windows, so that actually works. –  ikegami Feb 27 '13 at 16:07
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