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I am currently plotting (using Python-x,y 2.7.2.1) with several subplots, and I want to have all the y- labels in one line. Currently they are not, because the tick labels have different sizes. As a demonstration I add this script:

    import pylab as P
    import numpy as N

    x = N.linspace(0,2*N.pi,10000)
    y1 = N.sin(x)
    y2 = N.cos(x)*10000

    P.figure()
    ax1 = P.subplot(211)
    P.plot(x,y1,"k-")
    y1 = P.ylabel("$\\sin{(x)}$")
    P.xlim((0,2*N.pi))
    ax2 = P.subplot(212)
    P.plot(x,y2,"k--")
    y2 = P.ylabel("$\\cos{(x)}\\cdot{}10^4$")
    P.xlim((0,2*N.pi))
    P.show()

The Result looks like this, please note the labels that are shifted with respect to each other:

two graphs with shifted labels with respect to each other

I tried to set the label position by using

    (x,y) = y2.get_position()
    ax1.yaxis.set_label_coords(x,y)

but apparently they use different coorinates, as set_label_coords wants relative coordinates while get_position() seems to yield pixels or something. A desparation try using

    y1.set_x(x); y1.set_y(y)

did not have any effect. So I said to myself: Ask a specialist - so here I am. Can anyone tell me how to shift the labels, so they are in one line with respect to each other and look as awesome as expected?

I look forward to your answers.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can pad the position of the labels with

P.ylabel("$\\sin{(x)}$", labelpad=20)

and

P.ylabel("$\\cos{(x)}\cdot{}10^4$", labelpad=20)

with some adjustment, this should achieve what you desire. You can even set it after the plot with

ax.yaxis.labelpad = 20

The y label isn't correctly aligned as the length of the numbers on the y axis changes, and shifts the label position. You can fix the size of the number on the y axis with

from matplotlib.ticker import FuncFormatter

def thousands(x, pos):
    'The two args are the value and tick position'
    return '%4.1f' % (x*1e-3)

formatter = FuncFormatter(thousands)

ax = fig.add_subplot(211)
ax.yaxis.set_major_formatter(formatter)

This will guarantee that the length of the numbers on the y axis is always 4 characters, and so you can fix the offset of the y label for all values. Change the returned string in the thousands() function of this doesn't please you!

Edit

Yet another way to achieve this could be to hard code the position of your labels using set_label_coords

ax.yaxis.set_label_coords(0.5, 0.5)

I just spotted that method, and it might be of some use to you .. ! (0,0) is (left, bottom), (0.5, 0.5) is (middle, middle) etc.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually do that in my specific program, and the x label is no problem. I left this out here to keep it simple. For some reason the image just turned up in my post (creepy, isn't it?). So what I would like to achieve, is that the y1 and y2 label share the same left border and not the same distance to the tick labels on the right. Sorry I don't know how to make it more clear, I am not a native speaker. –  Faultier Feb 27 '13 at 13:15
    
Sorry for misunderstanding, have amended my response. –  danodonovan Feb 27 '13 at 13:24
    
Hey, no problem @danodonovan. I appreciate any help I can get! IMO P.subplot() does the same as fig.add_subplot(). As you can see in the figure shown above, the y labels are not in line, the graphs are. I look for a way to align not only the graphs but also the y-labels. –  Faultier Feb 27 '13 at 13:38
    
In add_subplot CHANGE 211 to 121 etc. –  danodonovan Feb 27 '13 at 13:39
    
oh I want the plots arranged as they are, but yes, thats a possibility to solve the problem (: I want the labels to be left-justified with respect to the left image border; but as far as I understand, they have their own bbox they stick to and I cannot make them move in a way that is pleasing the eye and the programmer... –  Faultier Feb 27 '13 at 13:44

As danodonovan says the set_label_coords is a possible way to do it. I might add that this setting worked well for me.

ax7.yaxis.set_label_coords(-0.2, 0.5)

The 'trick' is to use a negative number to move the label outside of the plot.

share|improve this answer
    
Very right, thats also how the matplotlib "howto" handles it: matplotlib.org/faq/… –  Faultier Apr 4 '13 at 19:31

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